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Found 548 results

  1. Let's keep this Norse mythology train rolling! Come swing by the #Twitch stream as I continue my casual playthrough of the all new #GodOfWar! ROYZYABOY! https://www.twitch.tv/royzoga123
  2. Time to continue that epic quest in #GodofWar tonight! Come swing by the #Twitch stream and hang out as I progress through my first playthrough! https://www.twitch.tv/royzoga123
  3. Time for some more smiley boy streams! Come check out some #speedrun attempts for #KingdomHearts on #Twitch! Can't keep the dope Disney train contained. ROYZYABOY! https://www.twitch.tv/royzoga123
  4. The dope Disney train don't stop! Come swing by the #Twitch stream to catch more of that smiley boy try some #speedrun attempts at #KingdomHearts! ROYZYABOY! https://www.twitch.tv/royzoga123
  5. After leaking online late yesterday in an online store listing, Activision has revealed today that Spyro the Dragon is indeed returning in late September in a fully remastered collection titled Spyro Reignited Trilogy. Unlike last year's Crash Bandicoot N. Sane Trilogy, which was remastered by Vicarious Visions, Spyro Reignited Trilogy is being worked on by Toys for Bob, the same developer that created the now-defunct Skylanders series. Insomniac Games, who developed the original Spyro trilogy of games, is not involved with this collection. IGN spoke with Toys for Bob's Paul Yan and Joshua Nadelberg, who revealed that the original score (which was composed by The Police's Stewart Copeland) has been reimagined for this collection. Also, while the original Spyro was split between two different voice actors, the Spyro in Reignited Trilogy will be entirely voiced by Tom Kenny -- the renowned voice actor behind Sponge Bob Squarepants and many other characters, and who originally did the voice for Spyro in Spyro: Ripto's Rage and Spyro: Year of the Dragon. Spyro Reignited Trilogy is slated for release on PlayStation 4 and Xbox One on September 21. No official release has been announced for Nintendo Switch as of yet, though the game is listed on Nintendo UK's online store; it is unknown if this is simply a mistake or if that version's reveal will come at a later time. Check out some of the gorgeous remastered footage from the remastered collection below. Source: PlayStation Blog Are you excited that Spyro is coming back?
  6. More practice, more grinding, and more #speedrun attempts for #KingdomHearts tonight! Come swing by and hope on that dope Disney train. ROYZYABOY! https://www.twitch.tv/royzoga123
  7. Another night, another grinding session for #KingdomHearts #speedrun attempts! Come swing by the #Twitch stream and watch this classic adventure get destroyed at a moderately quickened pace. ROYZYABOY! https://www.twitch.tv/royzoga123
  8. Time to spend my birthday smashing things and getting really angry at the Norse Gods. Come swing by my continued stream of the all new #GodofWar4 on #Twitch! I'll even be giving out a few gifted subs today for that Green Ranger hype! ROYZYABOY! https://www.twitch.tv/royzoga123
  9. Let's see how the all new #GodOfWar4 is, shall we? Come swing by the #Twitch stream as we delve into a different mythology with all the same violent, awesome combat! ROYZYABOY! https://www.twitch.tv/royzoga123
  10. Time for some more #KingdomHearts #Speedrun attempts! Come swing by and watch some of the madness and strats on #Twitch! ROYZYABOY! https://www.twitch.tv/royzoga123
  11. Taking a break from the Paper Mario runs, gonna play some more #KingdomHearts for the rest of the week! Come swing by and catch some #Speedrun attempts and practice on the #Twitch stream. ROYZYABOY! https://www.twitch.tv/royzoga123
  12. Hailinel

    Review: Attack On Titan 2

    Developer: Omega Force Publisher: Koei Tecmo Games Platform: Switch, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC Release Date: March 20, 2018 ESRB: M Note: This review is based on the PS4 version of the game Released in 2016, the original Attack on Titan was both a fun action game and a novel title from Omega Force, which for most of its history has been focused almost exclusively on the long-running Musou franchise. With Attack on Titan 2, the studio has returned to the world of high-flying, giant-slaying action, bringing some significant new twists along for the ride. Is a return to the world outside of the walls worth it? Like the original game, Attack on Titan 2 is based on the anime, rather than the original manga. Where the first game covered the scope of the first (and at that point, only) season of the series, the sequel covers both Seasons 1 and 2. The biggest change in terms of the story presentation, however, is in the point of view. New to the game is an original, player-created protagonist who joins the fight against the Titans alongside the established cast, and elements of the story have been rewritten to account for the player-character’s presence. For the most part, the presence of the new character works. The character creation system is robust, allowing for a fair degree of fine custom detail. The plot remains focused on Eren, Armin, Mikasa, and the other cadets of the 104th, giving the player a secondary observational role in most of the proceedings as famous scenes from the series play out. This premise does stretch itself thin in the latter half of the game, however, as the player zips back and forth between different battlefields as the characters are scattered, but that logistical detail is simple enough to forgive. The core gameplay of Attack on Titan 2 is nearly identical to that of the original game. During battle, the player can swing through the air using ODM (omni-directional mobility) gear to approach and latch onto rampaging Titans; giant, monstrous humanoids that can only be killed by striking at the napes of their necks, but who can be weakened or slowed down by severing their arms and legs. The core gameplay loop of approaching and downing Titans one after another is a satisfying one, but it can take practice to learn ideal positioning. And sometimes, what appears to be an ideal strike will result instead in a miss, causing the player to rebound away. Similar issues can arise when a Titan has been sent falling to the ground. Prone Titans can clip through nearby environmental objects such as buildings or supply bases, which can sometimes hamper getting in a clean shot on the nape. This can be mitigated with practice, but it’s still disappointing that Titans don’t react to the surrounding environment when they fall. In the original Attack on Titan, some portions of the story allowed the player to assume direct control of Eren’s Titan form, allowing for direct hand-to-hand combat against other Titans. While Attack on Titan 2 removes such sequences from the Story Mode’s primary scenarios, this feature has been given a new focus in a mini-game that becomes available at the Titan Research Lab. The player can “learn” about Titan behavior by taking on timed challenges while in control of one of the many standard Titans found in the game, though this feature isn’t available until after the player has managed to capture a Titan for the first time, rather than kill it. Getting rewarded for successful human-munching rampages is amusing and a good distraction from the game’s primary action, though the context of its inclusion relative to the story is bizarre. The biggest gameplay change to come with the sequel is a new emphasis on day-to-day life and activity. Between missions, the player has the freedom to wander the Trost District and other locales to speak with their comrades. Similar to mechanics in games like the Fire Emblem series, the player can raise support levels with various characters they meet by both fighting alongside them in battle and during social events responding to their comments appropriately. As these support levels rise, the player will gain access to new skills that boost stats or impart new combat abilities. That in mind, socializing is a must, and fortunately, many of the social event scenes in the game are entertaining. Outside of Story Mode, the other primary game mode is Another Mode. Playable in single-player as well as in online multiplayer, this mode is focused around completing smaller side-missions. These missions can generally be finished in a matter of minutes, making them ideal for quick play. Those that play it on the Switch also have the option of local wireless multiplayer, though I have not had the ability to test this feature out for myself. Online play quality has from my experience been OK, though I have also run into several connection errors while accessing online features in the lobby. The presentation in Attack on Titan 2 is on par with the original game. Its characters, both human and Titan, are rendered in colorful detail, and the story dialogue is fully voiced in Japanese. Performance is mostly smooth, though some battles that become particularly hectic with large numbers of Titans and aerial humans on screen at once can cause spots of momentary chugging. Attack on Titan 2 is what a good sequel should be. It improves on the key features of the original game, and its player-created protagonist adds a fresh take to previously-adapted material. While there are rough patches that could have used more polish, it’s a respectable sequel overall, and fans of the series should find it well worth their time. Pros + Fully adapts two seasons of the Attack on Titan anime from the perspective of an original protagonist + Tweaks to aerial combat provide the player with new options + The character progression system offers a great deal of flexibility + A larger roster of major and minor Attack on Titan characters can be unlocked for use in Another Mode Cons - Camera angles can sometimes make lining up an attack more difficult - Some of the finer elements of combat aren’t as well-explained as they could be, making some aspects of getting good at combat an at-times frustrating act of trial-and-error Overall Score: 8 (out of 10) Great Attack On Titan 2 is a worthy follow-up that improves on key features of the original game while also adding fresh takes, even if the game could use a bit more polish in some areas. Disclosure: This game was reviewed using a retail copy that was bought by the reviewer
  13. Zen Studios has been incredibly successful over the years with their licensed pinball adaptations, and next week they'll keep their streak going with a new two-pack based on Star Wars: The Last Jedi. One table will be based on the overall plot of the film, featuring the Resistance on the run from the First Order, Finn and Rose's side adventure to the casino world of Canto Bight, and the final showdown on Crait. The second table will focus on the other half of the movie -- namely, Rey's time on Ach-to with Luke Skywalker. You'll get to play through both tables in the Star Wars: The Last Jedi two-pack is released as DLC for Pinball FX3 on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and Steam as well as Mac, the App Store, and the Google Play Store on April 17. Check out the trailers for both tables below! Source: Press Release Will you be checking out the latest Star Wars-themed tables for Pinball FX3?
  14. Dragon Quest fans, you can rest easy now. Square Enix has finally confirmed Dragon Quest XI's release date in the West; you'll finally get to play it in September. Of course, we had previously heard from Dragon Quest creator Yuji Hori that the game would be making its way westward in 2018 so this doesn't come as too much of a surprise. Dragon Quest XI: Echoes of an Elusive Age will purportedly have over 100 hours of content and will also offer changes not seen in the original Japanese release, such as an English voiceover track, a new mode called "Draconian Quest" (essentially a hard mode for more experienced players), overhauled menus and UI, a camera mode that allows players to take in views of the landscapes and character models, and a new dash function in addition to improved character movement and camera control. If you pre-order the game on the PlayStation store, you'll gain access to "The Legend Reborn" theme in addition to DLC items when the game launches. Dragon Quest XI: Echoes of an Elusive Age will release on PlayStation 4 and Steam on September 4. You can check out some of the first footage of the Western version of the game below. Source: Press Release Are you excited for the release of Dragon Quest XI in the West?
  15. Time for an amazing #KingdomHearts #speedrun race! Come swing by the #Twitch stream and watch as I duke it out with @FaizedMouse in speedy fisticuffs! And of course, ROYZYABOY! https://www.twitch.tv/royzoga123
  16. The grind for sub 2:30 continues tonight! Come watch more of my #KingdomHearts #speedrun attempts on #Twitch and bring the hype. Together, we can make the smiley boy triumph over all! ROYZYABOY! https://www.twitch.tv/royzoga123
  17. Who would win? One smiley boy, or a bunch of Disney villains being butt heads? Be sure to tune in to tonight's #KingdomHearts #speedrun attempts on #Twitch and find out! Be sure to spam some of your favorite emotes too. ROYZYABOY! https://www.twitch.tv/royzoga123
  18. Another night, another grinding session of #KingdomHearts #speedrun attempts. Come check it out on #Twitch, hang out, and spam those favorite emotes! ROYZYABOY! https://www.twitch.tv/royzoga123
  19. Happy Friday everyone! Come swing by the #Twitch stream and hang out, watch some more #speedrun attempts for #KingdomHearts! Oh and be sure to bring the hype! ROYZYABOY! https://www.twitch.tv/royzoga123
  20. Developer: Sega Publisher: Sega Platform: PS4 Release Date: April 17, 2018 ESRB: M for Mature Over a decade after the series took Japan by storm, the West seems to have finally taken notice of Sega's intended spiritual child of Shenmue. Thanks to some highly memorable PS4 entries featuring the ex-yakuza with a heart of gold, Kiryu has suddenly become a recognizable gaming face alongside the Yakuza series itself. That's why it's more than a bit odd that we must bid Kiryu farewell just as the series is gaining momentum in 2018. Yet, with more than a half-dozen of his crime-centric stories etched upon the backs of various Sony console generations (including the highly recommended prequel: Yakuza 0) it does certainly have justification behind it. With the hopes telling one final tale deep into Kiryu's adulthood age does Yakuza 6: The Song of Life provide a worthy finale to the series' beloved main protagonist? Yakuza 6: The Song of Life is a confusing beast much like the lead protagonist it is focused upon. For veterans of the series the gameplay framework will be more than recognizable, from punching in the faces of countless thugs to playing Puyo Puyo at a random Sega arcade cabinet but thematically it will likely feel quite foreign. This is most true when Kiryu bounces from the all too familiar bustling starting town of Kumurocho (which has been a staple for every single main entry game) to the entirely new and much more rural location of Onomichi for more than half the main game. To avoid being too specific for spoiler-ish reasoning, the very loose pretense being that Kiryu gets saddled with taking care of a child in a quest of finding the would-be father. Of course, like any Yakuza storyline it never ends up being quite that simple for the "Dragon of Dojima" Kiryu and his unlucky interwoven fate with the criminal underground. To strongly punctuate the distinctly new Onomichi backdrop is in no small part because of the series' entirely different gameplay engine as well as the surprising focal point on new characters. The advanced gameplay engine often makes Yakuza 6 gorgeous both visually and aurally. It is also the first time in a long while the series hasn't felt shackled by dated PS3 hardware. Through the smart use of furrowed brows, eye contact, and other nonverbal tics it goes a long way in making the fresh setting and cast captivating aesthetically, alongside some strong musical accompaniment, even when story scenes get a little too self-indulgent in terms of running time and occasionally eye roll worthy story twists. Perhaps the strangest aspect about Yakuza 6 is that the story it tries to tell often feels quite removed from almost every prior title. Many fan-favorite characters are barely anywhere to be seen, for example, despite doing an admirable job at making one warm up to the new cast like the hotheaded thug Nagumo or his nonchalant patriarch Hirose. The only real exceptions to this independent storytelling philosophy being the intro that immediately follows up Yakuza 5's conclusion and the emotionally charged and satisfying finale for returning fans. While I grew to appreciate the refreshing (and generally more focused theme around family) change in storytelling dynamic, especially since Yakuza 4 and 5 had plenty of narrative throwback fanfare, I can definitely see a knee-jerk reaction from other longstanding Yakuza players expecting much more familiar territory for Kiryu's final adventure. I may have grown to appreciate the differences in Yakuza 6's approach towards narrative the gameplay is not quite as consistently well-realized within the snazzy new engine. Like most Yakuza titles there is a strong focus on soaking in the sights of Japan to just as quickly settling fights--and there's plenty reasoning to do both. The combat, in particular, is where Yakuza 6 comes across almost like a groundwork for future games than what it should be as a culmination of the series. There are some smart changes like much smoother transitions both in and out of battle, whereas the previous titles often felt like random encounters in role-playing games you couldn't really run away from. But Kiryu's overall moveset is more simplified this time around with the lack of Yakuza 0's combat stances or the character variety in games like Yakuza 4 & 5. It also doesn't help combat itself is made less responsive than it should be with some really wonky hit detection and bizarre usable item physics-- like some faceless thug casually able to kick a bicycle as if it were a soccer ball across the street. Sure, battles are still fun in a mindless beat 'em up way with a whole lot of visual flair, scripted story battles especially, but a handful of welcome tweaks does not save it from coming off as an arguably more clumsy battle system overall. Yet, Yakuza is one of those series that can often get past the more hit & aspects with its core systems due to the sheer breadth of optional side activities. As per the series' standard, there are a whole lot of distractions from the main story and the game is better for it since it helps distract from some occasional main story pacing flaws. Kiryu can go around doing all sorts of stuff like working out at a gym, sing karaoke, feeding stray cats to have them become part of a cat cafe, gamble, go to hostess bars, and more. There are some obvious winners like excellent ports of Sega games via in-game arcade cabinets like Fantasy Zone or Outrun to straight-up most recent editions of Virtua Fighter 5 and Puyo Puyo. The biggest loser, unfortunately, in terms of being just plain annoying despite the clever name involves "Troublr", which are time-sensitive missions that love to pop up at the most inconvenient times and try and guilt trip you for not helping right away. Some sidequests in particular, however, run surprisingly deep. Easily the most in-depth mode of all involves an overhead real-time strategy game in which Kiryu commands and recruits various warriors in an attempt to stop the iconic Japanese wrestler Rainmaker and his clan called "Justis" from terrorizing the city. There is a surprising amount of nuance to it like connecting online to battle other clans or learning the synergy between certain recruits so they get better stats, even though you can easily over-level your way through it with exp bonuses. Aside from that there are also much more bite-sized side stories which are usually when the localization is at its sharpest because of their either heartwarming or totally bizarre scenarios, all of which are fully-voiced now. As entertaining as much of the side content is, it is disappointing that Yakuza 6 is scaled back in several regards. Quite literally, The main town of Kumurocho has several familiar locations straight up closed off because of in-game construction that never goes away making the adventure feel more claustrophobic than several games before it. Onomichi being even smaller with even less to do (aside from the main story) does not help its case. It is among one of the shortest adventures in the series, and while the game benefits from it story-wise, there is only about half as much to do compared to earlier releases outside of it. Much like Kiryu does as a person throughout his life, Yakuza 6: The Song of Life ends up stumbling in a lot of places despite having its heart in the right place. Everything from its remarkably different and self-contained main narrative structuring to the completely overhauled combat system will almost guarantee that it will rub returning series' fans the wrong way for one reason or another. But what Yakuza 6 does showcase is plenty of passion, like the surprisingly likable new cast to the entertaining (but somewhat more limited) side activities, which permeates throughout the experience and helps the game stand tall. Even though Yakuza 6: The Song of Life may not present the series at its peak performance (that'd be Yakuza 0), it is still a more than worthwhile adventure that does not simply rest on its former achievements to earn one's respect over time. Pros +Visually and aurally captivating presentation + Develops the entirely new cast of characters well like turning obnoxious goons into likable companions + Enticing side stories and mini games + Good quality of life additions like the series finally discovering auto-saving Cons - Some underwhelming reveals and the very self-contained main story arc can be disappointing for longstanding series fans - Despite being completely overworked the combat system actually controls less responsively due to some iffy hit detection - Closed off city spaces and less overall side activities than one has come to expect from the series Overall Score: 7.5 (out of 10) Good Yakuza 6: The Song of Life strides to go in a remarkably different direction with its themes without abandoning much of the inherent charm the games have become known for showcasing. But at the cost of shedding some of its gameplay strengths in particular in the brand new engine leads to it not quite standing toe to toe with series' best entries. Disclosure: This game was reviewed using downloadable PS4 code provided by the publisher.
  21. #KingdomHearts #Speedrun continues tonight on #Twitch! Come swing by and have some fun, chat, and spam your favorite emotes. Only positive vibes tonight, let's wash away that salt! ROYZYABOY! https://www.twitch.tv/royzoga123
  22. Nearly a year after its initial release, SEGA has announced today that Sonic Mania will be getting an all-new edition of the game called Sonic Mania Plus. This new version will not only be the first real physical version of the game, it also includes a SEGA Genesis reversible cover (for those nostalgic for old Genesis boxart covers), a 32-page art book, and two new characters: Ray the Flying Squirrel and Mighty the Armadillo. The latter might be more familiar to longtime Sonic fans, since Mighty appeared in Knuckles' Chaotix on SEGA's short-lived 32X add-on for the Genesis. But both characters first appeared in a Japanese-only arcade game called SegaSonic the Hedgehog (no, I'm not making this up!). SEGA says there is "more" to the game as well, leading us to believe they'll reveal more info leading up to its release. In the meantime, you can look forward to playing Sonic Mania Plus when it releases this Summer on Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and Nintendo Switch. Source: SEGA (via Twitter) Are you interested in Sonic Mania Plus and its new additions?
  23. It's time to get salty at missing one cycle Jafar once again, oh and #speedrun more #KingdomHearts for a while tonight! Come swing by the #Twitch stream and hang out, spam some awesome emotes! ROYZYABOY!
  24. The grind on #KingdomHearts #speedrun practice continues tonight! Since the weekend, I watched the WR a few times to try and take notes, so maybe some new routing? Come hang out on #Twitch and spam those awesome emotes! ROYZYABOY! https://www.twitch.tv/royzoga123
  25. Time to play and practice some more #KingdomHearts #speedrun and junk! Come swing by the #Twitch stream have some fun, spam your favorite emotes. ROYZYABOY! https://www.twitch.tv/royzoga123
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