Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Moon'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Welcome to Game Podunk
    • Information and Announcement
    • Welcome New Members
    • Game Podunk Contests
    • Featured Blog Contest
  • Community and Network
    • Podunker Help Desk
    • GP Videos
    • Bonfire Chatting
    • Members Lounge
    • Forum Activities
  • Video Games Discussion
    • General Game Discussion
    • Sony
    • Microsoft
    • Nintendo
    • PC, Mac, and Mobile Games
    • Retro and Classic Games
  • Popular Entertainment
    • Food & Drink
    • Pop Culture and Other Media
  • Shopping Deals, Contests, and Sweepstakes
    • Deals
    • Contests and Giveaways

Categories

  • Industry News
    • Sony
    • Nintendo
    • Microsoft
    • PC
    • iOS/Android
  • Videos
  • Features
    • Individual Values
    • Monday Musings
  • Analysis & Opinions
  • Reviews
    • PS3 Reviews
    • PS4 Reviews
    • Xbox 360 Reviews
    • Xbox One Reviews
    • Wii/U Reviews
    • 3DS/DS Reviews
    • Vita/PSP Reviews
    • PC Reviews
    • Mobile Reviews
    • Switch Reviews
  • Interviews

Blogs

  • Mischief.Mayhem.Blog
  • This Is Where I Keep Unfinished Articles
  • Marcus' Thoughts
  • Blazing Storm
  • The Game Dungeon
  • Random!!
  • Leah's Little Blog of Gaming
  • Palmerama's Bloggerama
  • Harrison's Soapbox
  • A Few Thoughts
  • Unexpected Perspective
  • Cassius Orelad's Blog
  • sirdan357's Blog
  • Pixels N' Stuff
  • Number 905's Blog
  • The Black Hole
  • The Dusty Corner
  • Cipher Peon's Impressions
  • My Thoughts on Stuff in Games
  • The New Zealand Khorner
  • Ludono's Blog and Stuff
  • Unlock Game Earlier Blog
  • 3 Second Violation With Kezins
  • What's that smell?
  • Knightly Times
  • Digital Hoarders - Anime Edition
  • Venomous Incorporated
  • Persona 4 The Golden Diary
  • Musings on Games
  • Crasty's Lair
  • Den of Polygons
  • Final Pr0bl3m
  • Spooky Scary Storytime with Pixel
  • Kaptain's Quarters
  • The Angry Leprechaun
  • RivalShadeX's Blog
  • Roy's Ruelle
  • DarkCobra86's Blog
  • Meet The Podunkers!
  • Great Games For Free
  • JakobPea's Dumb Blog of Probably Games
  • JanicedCollins' Blog
  • Inside The Box
  • Ciel's AC New Leaf Blog
  • Anime Quickies
  • Waiting for the Greenlight
  • Kiwi's Adventures to Win the Video Game
  • Video Games As Art
  • JanicedCollins' Blog
  • Attack on GamePodunk
  • Paragraph Film Reviews
  • barrel's Blog
  • JoelJohn's Blog
  • Pokemon X Chronicles
  • Ciel's Blog
  • Limitless Revelations
  • GamePodunk of Thrones
  • InClement Opinions
  • Sookielioncourt's Blog
  • Randomness Ahoy!
  • JohnkyKong's Blog
  • A Realm Re-Reborn
  • Television and Movies
  • Games, Games, Games
  • Kamek's List/Review Blog
  • Reviewer's Woes
  • alloygator's Blog
  • Royzoga's Streaming Adventures
  • An Overview of the Medical Billing Services by P3 Healthcare Solutions!
  • The Game Start Blog

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Twitter


Skype


AIM


MSN


Yahoo


Website URL


Backloggery


Steam


PSN


XBL


Wii


3DS


Location


Interests

Found 6 results

  1. Moon: A Remix RPG Adventure has very few contemporaries. You’ll hear people describe some of its mechanics as being similar to The Legend of Zelda: Majora’s Mask or Chibi-Robo! Plug Into Adventure, but it predates them both. After some brief exposition that mostly serves as a parody of the genre, it’s an RPG where there’s no combat to be found. Its opening hours managed to successfully transport me back to the late ‘90s—and all the feelings that came with. I'll share just some of those feelings now: When I was about eleven years old, in 1998, I played Yoshi’s Story for the Nintendo 64. It’s one of the most innocuous narratives Nintendo’s ever penned: some newborn Yoshis set out to rescue the Super Happy Tree from Baby Bowser by... eating lots of fruit and having fun. The page turns, the Yoshis grow happier. Happiness was... 'the point.' I was enamored. I totally put together a picture book that told the story of the game after I beat it—like I said, enamored. As I played it over and over again, I eventually wanted to learn its secrets. And that’s how I came across the two “hidden Yoshis” you have to save—a black one and a white one. Saving the white Yoshi egg from its bubbly prison and carrying it to safety proved difficult for Little Me. And that’s how an eleven year-old boy wound up crying to his father in frustration. “Because I’m not good enough, that cute Yoshi’s gonna be trapped and sad forever.” Fortunately, my dad was empathetic and just encouraged me to keep trying, instead of scolding me for crying. But... that’s how it’s always been, with me. Video games played a part in teaching me empathy from a young age. Whenever I play Super Mario World, I always take Yoshi with me—he deserves to help rescue his friends. If I reach a point in the level where Mario has to go it alone, I still quietly say, “Bye Yoshi,” to whatever screen I’m staring at. It’s the same with Kirby whenever he greets me, interacting with my innumerable Pokémon, or any video game friend I come across: I primarily engage with video games because it’s a way to make these fictional characters and worlds happier than they were before. In case it wasn’t obvious by now, I’m a pacifist. Violence is only ever a last resort for me, and seeing even cartoonish “blood & guts” tends to weird me out, let alone how... um, over the top Mortal Kombat’s gotten as of late. I’m always thinking critically about the kinds of games I engage with. Characters like Mario make me happy, because the enemies you best aren’t really killed. Turn the same corner, and they’re back where they were, like you were never there. The robots Sonic destroys have cute animals inside—he’s just out to free his friends. Monsters in Dragon Quest V offer to join your party specifically after you defeat them... so you’re probably not murdering everything that crosses your path, so much as “making them faint” like Pokémon. This is the part where I mention Undertale, an RPG where you don’t have to kill anyone. It was the first RPG I’ve ever played where I felt comfortable enough to be myself—basically running from everyone with my tail between my legs. It’s pretty much my go-to example these days when I’m referencing games that can be empathetic. In the context of that world, the monsters you fight—or don’t fight—have hearts. You’re absolutely encouraged not to kill them, and you’re pretty severely challenged (and punished) if you do. So when the creator of Undertale brought up Moon as a game that inspired it, the quirky PS1 “anti-RPG” from the late nineties certainly had my attention. It was ported to Nintendo Switch and localized in regions outside Japan this year for the first time ever, two decades after its initial release. In Moon, you play as a little boy who gets sucked into the world of the RPG he was playing by way of his TV. The boy quickly learns the hero he played as is actually a freaking jerk—just a nuisance in general, plus he runs around killing monsters that were just minding their own business and doing no harm. It definitely has all the trappings of a pacifist game. Instead of killing enemies to gain experience points like the hero, the little boy saves the souls of dearly departed monsters by just catching them, gaining Love instead. He never hurts anyone. The player is acting against the typical RPG hero; the goal is just to hang around various locales in the world, getting to know and helping everyone you see. You gain Love that’s quantified in the game, and hopefully the kind of love that goes beyond it. “Bye, Yoshi.” In order to get to the heart of why I’ve sat down to write all this out, I have to spoil the endings of both Moon and Undertale. Stop reading if you’d rather not know what happens, then come back when you do. Here’s a scene from the former's ending. The little boy has helped build a rocket, and he actually blasts off to the moon. He needs to eventually be the one to open “The Door to the Light”, and thwart that murdering jerk of a hero once and for all with the power of his Love. When you arrive, the fifty souls of monster friends you’ve saved are waiting for you. It’s a scene that’s extremely similar to what Undertale’s title screen becomes if you don’t hurt anything—there are lots of happy friends. Moon absolutely sets you up like you’re about to see a happy ending. The quantifiable Love you earned should work hand in hand with your love for all your new fictional friends & the world. The quirky characters kept me going, despite rather dated frustrations. But then... once the little boy learns he can’t open the door at all, and the hero has snuck on board his rocket... my gosh, do things take a turn. Scenes of the “hero” slicing through the souls of every single monster I saved were genuinely tough to watch. The camera forces you to see the hero’s point of view for almost the first time in the entire story, going out of its way to show him erasing all those friendly monsters from existence. All the while, three guiding characters that have been around for my entire adventure were constantly saying, “Because you failed to open the door, because your Love wasn’t strong enough, we meet a tragic end.” They said, “goodbye, jon,” before the “hero” sliced them to literal bits in front of me—bits of data. Oh, that’s the chilliest part of all. See: in Undertale, if you do kill a monster, you see its pixelated heart break in two. It’s meant to have a soul—to feel real. Moon, by contrast, depicts dead monsters as what they are to folks who don’t feel like I do—just data. Cold, empty, meaningless husks of data. If you think of the hundreds of data chips piled on the ground between “JON” the hero and “jon” the boy as corpses, this ending screen of Moon is downright terrifying. “Please, jon. Maybe there’s another reality out there where you do open the door.” Your wizard friend’s parting words still ring in your ears as...the little boy’s mother manages to pull him out of the TV’s trance and tells him to go to bed. Faced with this screen & fresh memories of friendly characters getting unceremoniously murdered specifically because you failed everyone... you’re given a choice. If you select YES when prompted to continue, the boy gets sucked back into the world inside the TV and “END” appears on the bottom right of your screen. All you’re left with is an empty bedroom. Wanting to go back and correct your failures as a player—wanting to save your monster friends this time is... the wrong choice to make, in Moon. As you move the cursor to select NO, the camera pans to highlight the boy’s door. If you do select it, the boy puts down his controller and opens the door to his room, leaving the game behind. The ending shows all kinds of doors opening up after he does this… including the “Door to the Light” you failed to open in the game moments before. You watch the surviving human NPCs go through it, as if that’s supposed to make everything better. Does the ending expect me to forget that I’ve left these other characters for dead? I feel like Moon doesn’t believe that Love can or should be quantified in video games. I’m not really sure it believes video games should be empathetic at all. It would rather you learn to love the real world instead—because the monsters and people you met as you played through everything are just bits of data, after all. There’s no way to save them from meeting their tragic end... except to stop playing, and choose “NO” even when you know you’ve failed. Most of the deep connections that people feel to fiction are beneficial. Make-believe characters are so much more powerful than just actors on TV, or bits of data callously murdered on screen. I watched Moon’s ending on YouTube after I rolled credits on my Switch, because I was convinced I really had done something wrong and failed. People in the comments sung its praises as an example of games as art. But I feel like the whole thing’s very cynical—like the developers see video games as a product & their characters as just... marketing tools. It seems like they’re criticizing the medium by saying that Love will never work as a variable that can be measured, like “experience points” or a high score. But Undertale begs to differ. God, my experiences as a player beg to differ. I’m very much aware that Pokémon aren’t real. But my connections to them are. I’ve got a Pikachu hanging out in Pokémon Shield that’s been my friend for fifteen years, “traveling across time and space” to be with me since we met in Pokémon LeafGreen. How I feel about that li’l Pikachu is absolutely quantified, game after game. I’ve genuinely never felt more disappointed with a video game than I have when I finished Moon. In how the story chooses to end, it undoes every bit of empathy I gained from learning about its world. I just wanted to sit down and communicate why a game whose playable character literally gains Love... instead may make you hurt by the end.
  2. Welcome to the eighty-ninth week of my Pokémon feature here on Game Podunk! In case you missed last week's, check it out. Stay tuned for future entries coming every Friday. Genesect is being distributed at GameStop until November 24th. Every single Mythical Pokémon will be distributed during a specific month for the remainder of this year. Now may be your only chance for a really long time, to actually catch them all! -------------------------------- The Wait Is Over As you“re reading my final thoughts before sitting down to play Pokémon Sun...I“m probably curled up somewhere, making my way through it. The rolled out this week, too. The end of it, which showed off a collection of all the “big moments” as they were revealed to us since February, definitely made the cogs in my head turn a little. Over the next few weeks, my brain will shift from speculative to critical...since I“ll be reviewing the game. It“s been over 85 weeks since I started this Individual Values feature, on the cusp of Omega Ruby & Alpha Sapphire. Time and time again, Game Freak has made me think critically about this goofy series with psychic surfing, purple ghosts and Popplio...and where my life [and future wife] are now because of it. I“ve chronicled all my thoughts over tens of thousands of words, making sure to leave no stone unturned. We“ve been fed tiny trailer bits for almost nine months that all seem to indicate, “Things are different this time! Better than ever before! There“s so much to do, and so much to see.” They“ve had an unprecedented bolster in sales expectations, likely due to the success of Pokémon GO—another thing I would have never seen coming, at the start of all this. All of Shigeru Ohmori“s proverbial [Psy]ducks are in a row. There“s never been a better opportunity to release a brand new Pokémon game, especially one that mixes up long-established series conventions. And that“s why...I“m going to be among its harshest critics. I“ve been around and in love with the series for most of its major marketing shifts. The last time Game Freak tried to do something “different” was Black 2 & White 2—my least favorite games in the entire franchise. I know these are fundamentally different times and approaches. But rest assured, even if I never get around to properly elaborating on what exactly I dislike about B2&W2, I will not gush about Sun & Moon just because they're different. One thing I“ll note in particular, speaking of Unova. The Festival Plaza seems like a refresh of Join Avenue, from those games. Now that they“ve taken an entire generation to improve upon Pokémon“s online communications, I“ll be interested to see just how much the basic concept has evolved since 2012. There are multiple parallels to be drawn from the franchise“s entire history...and I suppose that“s fitting, for the “major anniversary games”. I wonder how hard I“ll be fighting with myself to write a review that doesn“t sound like a glorified list of “same vs. different”. I suppose there“s not much left to say, other than that. Let“s all see and judge for ourselves, starting today! I“m not sure what the next few Individual Values pieces will focus on, but you can at least expect a full review, another “The Year in Pokémon”, and...one heck of a send-off to Pokémon“s 20th anniversary from me, at least.
  3. Welcome to the seventy-sixth week of my Pokémon feature here on Game Podunk! In case you missed last week's, check it out! Stay tuned for future entries coming every Friday. Arceus will be available at participating GameStop stores until August 24th.You'll need to get a card with a serial code. Every single Mythical Pokémon will be distributed during a specific month for the remainder of this year. Now may be your only chance for a really long time, to actually catch them all! -------------------------------- Paradigm Shift I think I“m finally beginning to understand why it took The Pokémon Company so long to reveal Sun & Moon. After weeks of my focus being outside of the upcoming games, has given me way more than just new Pokémon to talk about. Before I address the specific pieces and parts of the footage we got, let me open with this: Each region in the World of Pokémon definitely has some unique characteristics and places to them. My Region Spotlights highlighted some cool sights to see in each region, as well as what I felt were the main “point”s each game was trying to communicate through its locales. Regardless of how each region differs thematically, one of the biggest criticisms I“ve heard from people who left the series is that “Pokémon is the same game over and over. Get eight badges in gyms, defeat the Big Bad, get the Legendary on the box, and win.” There isn“t really much defense you can offer towards this argument. With the exception of Pokémon Black & White, every game ends with a Hall of Fame entry, after all. Gyms have long been what“s held the Pokémon series back, in my opinion. No matter how distinguished a region is, or what lengths a game“s mechanics help to set them apart from the ones that came before it--it“s still “get 8 badges to win”. Omega Ruby made me happy when it gave me the National Pokédex and said “okay, the world“s your oyster now” before I defeated the Elite 4 and became the League champ--that was a nice change of pace. ...But after seeing the new footage, watching what appears to be the first major paradigm shift in Pokémon history since the Nintendo WFC was introduced to it back in 2007...I haven“t been This Freaking Excited for a new crop of Pokémon games in a long while. BUT FIRST! Let“s talk about my precious little ice fox. I know the Internet seems far more attached to Exeggutor, but there“s a clear winner for “best new Alola forme” in my heart, and it“s not just because Vulpix is my fiancée“s favorite Pokémon. Let“s briefly address what “region-specific formes” bring to mind. Will this new appearance and typing only affect Alolan Vulpixes you find in the wild, who have made this place their habitat for However Long? Or will there be some way to transform a Vulpix you caught in Kalos or elsewhere, once you“ve transferred them over using Pokémon Bank? While there“s no conclusive evidence yet, I suspect it“s going to be the former. It gives folks who“ve already raised these critters a reason to raise another all over again. Might make a few folks angry? I“m indifferent either way. I also feel like Exeggutor, Vulpix/Ninetales, and Sandshrew/Sandslash are just the beginning. that explains why Marowak/Cubone could be getting an Alolan forme as well. But the biggest one missing for me personally is Tropius. The Alolan region and Exeggutor both boast tropicality -- Tropius kind of sticks out like a sore thumb now, doesn“t it? It really does feel like they“re going above and beyond to make the Alolan Pokédex -- not just the region itself -- feel unique (Rotom, don“t forget!) and tropical, in nature. I haven“t run into a single design for the 7th Generation Pokémon that I don“t like. Whether we“re talking critters that spawn a million Donald Trump memes, a Pokémon that just wants to be loved like Pikachu, or a freaking meteorite with a brand new ability to distinguish itself… I“m truly happy with how the Pokémon of this region are shaping up. The biggest change introduced to Sun & Moon so far was its new UI, which I went on about some time ago. With that, they addressed a pretty consistent criticism with the series, making things more accessible to newcomers who weren“t all that familiar with Pokémon attacks and how they worked. The second huge criticism their addressing appears to be how to deal with HMs, as seen with "Riding Pokémon". These allies will never become a part of your team, but they can be called upon whenever, to carry out properties similar to Surf, Rock Smash, Fly, and possibly more. While it“s not directly stated that these new buddies are going to be the replacement of HMs, so that you don“t need to bog down Pokémon on your team with moves like Cut for the entire game, it“s certainly implied, from both the footage and the website. Huge deal! But the hugest deal of all is the Island Challenge. Without going into too much detail--new Trial Captains seem to offer many unique tasks that aren“t confined to the four walls of a gym anymore, allowing for much more varied tasks that aren“t always “battle the trainers to get to the leader, then win”. Regardless of how the challenge is constructed, there definitely isn“t a Gym Leader at the end of it -- instead, they“ve introduced “Totem Pokémon”. These super strong foes fight you one-on-one... until you“re about to make them faint, then it becomes two-on-one, in what“s called an “S.O.S. Battle”. After you“ve defeated each island“s trial--there“s a Kahuna waiting at the end. I think it“s supposed to function like the “Elite 4” of sorts, since there are four islands and four Kahunas [who also govern each island]. But you don“t save fighting them for the end of the game! So: for the first time in series history: there are no Gyms or Gym Leaders, so the game“s biggest challenges aren“t confined to small buildings in any given town. And -- there doesn“t appear to be an Elite 4 or Pokémon League, outside of the Kahunas themselves... so I genuinely have no idea how this game is going to end. Even if I liked the idea behind gyms (I never have...not since after GSC, anyway), not knowing what“s going to happen next excites the heck out of me. I haven“t even gotten to Z-Moves or how this crazy thing ties into the Pokémon Sun & Moon experience. Maybe I“ll devote an entire piece to them sometime, since they seem primarily focused on letting smaller Pokémon like Pikachu pack a larger punch than previously conceivable, in battle. But: with the UI change, seemingly replacing HMs with Riding Pokémon instead, and the removal of gyms -- we could be seeing the dawn of a new era in Pokémon. What if no new regions going forward had gyms, and instead offered a unique narrative and challenges going forward that no “Pokémon expatriate” could call “more of the same”. I hope the concept of Island Trials--not Gyms--are carried into future main games, to help each and every new region going forward feel refreshing and new. We won“t be waiting long for new news, it seems, as The Pokémon Company has promised even more stuff in less than a week. How do you all feel about some of the biggest changes to come to the series? If you“ve previously become disinterested in Pokémon -- will some of these brand new elements bring you back?
  4. Welcome to the seventy-first week of my Pokémon feature here on Game Podunk! In case you missed the last one, check it out! Stay tuned for future entries coming every Friday. If you're reading this on the day it's published, Shaymin should be available via the Nintendo Network. It'll be live from July 1st through 24th. Every single Mythical Pokémon will be distributed during a specific month for the remainder of this year. Now may be your only chance for a really long time, to actually catch them all! -------------------------------- Interface These past few weeks have been filled with all kinds of surprise twists. I“ll get to E3 2016 in a moment since just one aspect of is what I“ll be focusing on. But after I got back from Los Angeles, I caught one heck of a severe cold [hence my absence last week], and then... three Pokémon Mystery Dungeon games were released on the Wii U Virtual Console. Europe already had Red & Blue Rescue Team, the first games in the series. But we got Explorers of Sky ahead of them -- you know, the one I said was the pinnacle of the series both in a previous IV and in my Pokémon Super Mystery Dungeon review. Since I replayed the entirety of Sky“s main story and Special Episodes while I was in repair -- next week, I“ll talk about the Pokémon Mystery Dungeon series quite a bit. For now, let“s go back to the main series. There are plenty of to talk about. Heck, they even revealed . And Battle Royale seems like it“s going to turn the competitive metagame on its head once again. But my biggest takeaway from the 45 minute “Zelda distraction” from Nintendo“s inaugural Treehouse Live stream for this year“s E3 is how welcoming and crazy-good the new UI feels in Pokémon Sun & Moon. Barrel can attest, ”cause he watched it right along with me: I was over the moon about how cleaned up the menus looked in battle, and how much more accessible they“ve made attacks, typing and more. I will never not fight for making the games I love friendlier to newcomers. I“m the type to consider adding Easy Mode to Dark Souls and other “controversial” fodder. Thankfully, though, Pokémon“s barrier of entry is relatively tame. Key items like the Experience Share (current gen) have made the grind easier than it“s ever been, which helps more people finish what they start. Everything“s become rhythmical and increasingly easier to bear over time, because -- as the adage goes -- it“s always someone“s first ever Pokémon game. Still, the Pokémon series“ largest barrier is... that there are now over 721 Pokémon. We might break 800 with every new critter Sun & Moon introduce! So let me be the first to say: it“s about dang time that they“ve rolled out a UI that accounts for things like what type an enemy Pokémon is, what move that you select will be most effective against it, and even how your specific stats have been lowered by altering moves like “Growl” and Abilities like “Intimidate”. There“s no more uncertainty when it comes to that. If you“re the type, you can literally stack numbers against your opponent, to see who will come out on top! Gosh, it feels so utterly refreshing. I“ve been waiting for them to make cosmetic changes like this to the battle menu since at least Diamond & Pearl. The battle menus aren“t all that“s improved, though. Zeroing in on your character when a trainer is near will stop from being surprised when a battle initiates, and make for the younger crowd playing these games to have an easier time of it. Indeed, I“m quite interested in the narrative, for the Sun & Moon Legendaries, how Magearna factors in to all this, the QR code stuff, and more. But my single biggest takeaway from all the E3 news and footage is that Pokémon as a whole just got a little more welcoming. The changes appear subtle to most people, but I for one am elated. It“s been a long time coming!
  5. DrPixel

    Pixel Reviews: MirrorMoon EP (PC)

    Developer: Santa Ragione Publisher: Santa Ragione Platform: PC Release Date: September 4th, 2013 Can endless content justify a repetitive game? Well, in most cases, sure! There's plenty of randomized games out there that are forced to seem somewhat repetitive due to their generation system having a limited number of stuff to chug in. However, if the core gameplay that makes up a randomized game isn't very fun, the satisfaction of achieving something is lost quite a bit. MirrorMoon EP makes this huge mistake, and though it is satisfying to contribute to something larger, which is the game's "cool" feature, the path getting there is filled with either confusion, utter ease, or boredom. MirrorMoon EP is a game about exploring....solar systems! Players pilot their spaceship (don't worry, it just automatically flies there for you, after a delay depending on how far away your destination is) to whichever star they want to embark upon. After they finish, the player is allowed to name the star whatever they want. Sounds pretty neat, right? Unfortunately, this game gets stale fast. If you aren't initially confused for hours like I was, you're probably wizzing by, naming every blank star in sight, and by the time you get to my playtime I would assume you are bored. Each "puzzle" consists of the player collecting items or moving over certain checkpoints for the end goal of finding some sort of egg-like device you merely have to touch. Each star is randomized of course, so some have really tough puzzles and others are incredibly easy. On my 4th star I visited I actually had the egg right in front of me and I essentially finished the star in just a few seconds! However, I'm not completely against the game's basic puzzle system. It also luckily incorporates some certainly unique manipulation of light in the puzzles. I absolutely loved that you could move the moon adjacent to your planet/star to provide light or darkness so you can see certain things you need. It's something I think that's never been done before in a game and it's very fascinating! Another thing to mention is that the game gives you extremely minimal instruction and you are left to your own curiosity to discover what to do to progress and achieve the end goal of leaving your footprint in dozens of stars. As I said earlier, I was completely confused as to how I actually got to other stars for quite a while and so I almost gave up on the game entirely! Going back to give it a second and then later third chance was probably a good idea though. MirrorMoon EP really does have some very interesting ideas in place that would be neat to check out later down the road. In its current state though, this is an explorative game of discovering new content through player co-operation, just not in the traditional sense. You don't physically encounter anyone else in the vastness of space, but seeing that they already did some of the work for you is very neat. Aesthetically, MirrorMoon EP is a curious one. The game's setting of....well, the unknown reaches of space causes the graphical style to take on a much simpler form. Using shapes and structures that even small children could recognize really shows that we as humans know next to nothing about the great space beyond our humble planet. The colors aren't strict reds, blues, or yellows, but more so blends and shades of these. It's also worthy to note that the game's randomized style also involves each planet/star's appearance. There can be odd plant-like things swaying in the wind, rays of light all over, or even rain. I would have loved to see more different variations in each locale, but unfortunately I will admit my patience was lacking so I didn't explore more. The music shows a sense of new, unknown thoughts. Using ambient, peaceful tunes was a good idea on the musician's part. Since the game is about exploration and discovery, this fits pretty much perfectly. The player really has no clue how huge or small each star is and because of that they don't know what native sounds may be in the background. It isn't overly impressive, but the soundtrack for this game is fairly good at capturing a sense of ambient exploration. I wasn't a huge fan of MirrorMoon EP, but I'm sure there are those out there who adore it. If exploring very basic planets and trying to solve randomly-generated worlds primarily via item collecting and manipulating light sounds fun to you, this is the perfect game for you. For casual puzzle or adventure fans though, this might be a tough game to grasp. It certainly was for me, and I just couldn't really get into it as others really have. Bold creativity and some neat ideas sadly did not hold up to the somewhat dull gameplay, in my opinion. I give this game a: 6.5/10
×