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Found 16 results

  1. Earlier this morning, Square-Enix held a Dragon Quest-focused event announcing a ton of new Dragon Quest content, as well as elaborating on a few previously announced titles. The star of the show was definitely Dragon Quest XI: In Search of Departed Time--a game confirmed for PlayStation 4, Nintendo 3DS...and possibly the Nintendo NX, alongside Dragon Quest X. Before elaborating on Dragon Quest XI, it“s important to note that Square-Enix has said Dragon Quest X and XI are “being considered” for the NX. Still, this marks the first set of games publicly mentioned as (possibly) coming to the platform, so a bunch of eyes are on these games. Without further ado: Dragon Quest XI“s producer is Saito Yosuke. Known Dragon Quest composer Koichi Sugiyama is returning for this game, and spoke during the event about how series creator Yuji Horii asked him to capture the same spirit as the very first Dragon Quest game in his work. Between this game and Dragon Quest Builders, it seems the 30th Anniversary of Dragon Quest will show how far the series has come by developing games with visible ties to the first ever Dragon Quest. Onto what makes each version of the game unique. The screens you see above are from the PlayStation 4 version of the game, which is being made using Unreal Engine 4. The environments are something Square-Enix are putting a lot of time into. Monsters will appear in the world before battles start, similar to Dragon Quest IX. Players have been given full range of motion for the first time in the series, allowing them to potentially explore high or hard to reach areas, too. They showed off the game“s protagonist, a look at an Inn (featuring pots to break and drawers to rummage through), and much more. Orca are helping Square-Enix with the PlayStation 4 version of the game. Take a look at the Nintendo 3DS version! This one“s being developed with the help of Toylogic, a team known for their involvement with Super Smash Bros. Brawl and Kid Icarus: Uprising in the past. It“s still got the same team of people at Square-Enix behind it, and it“ll have the same story as its console counterpart. But as you can see--instead of a large focus on graphics, this game takes a bit of a different approach when it comes to visuals. The top screen features a modern Dragon Quest aesthetic, while the bottom has players indulging what the game would look like if it were made 20 years ago for the Super Famicom/NES. I“m such a huge fan of this visual style! The question is--which versions of the game will be localized? Will we miss out on the Nintendo 3DS version? Are we going to get the PlayStation 4 version for sure, since Dragon Quest Heroes is mere months away from a western release? Will X and XI be localized for the very first time on the Nintendo NX when it releases...sometime? There are many questions we don“t yet know the answers to, but I“ll offer more information as it comes. Dragon Quest XI is aiming for a 2016 release in Japan, to coincide with the 30th Anniversary. If you're interested in watching the entire presentation (in Japanese), I've embedded it below. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Kgmb_k3q5U Are you excited for Dragon Quest XI? Be sure to let us know!
  2. Nintendo Directs are really my favorite thing. Ever since I first started dabbling in this whole “writing about games” thing, I“ve always found that live presentations and convention settings are where I absolutely thrive. So, of course I“m excited that Nintendo of America, Nintendo of Europe and Nintendo of Japan have announced a new Nintendo Direct for January 14th (this Wednesday)! I may or may not be flailing around like Kermit the frog. This new Direct, according to the announcement(s), will focus on Wii U and 3DS games releasing in Spring 2015. It begins broadcasting at 9 AM ET, 6 AM PT. For those of you unfamiliar: think of Nintendo Direct(s) like a miniature version of E3 Press Conferences. Nintendo has done things like announce EarthBound for the Virtual Console in North America and Europe through these things, or debut Kirby Triple Deluxe and what would become A Link Between Worlds. Crazy things have happened! With that in mind: What are some of your predictions for the upcoming Direct? I suspect we“ll see concrete release dates for Majora“s Mask 3D, Kirby and the Rainbow Curse, Yoshi“s Woolly World and more. And I also suspect that the New 3DS will finally be revealed to North America. Might we get a concrete date for the Xenoblade Chronicles port that was announced in Japan a few months back? I“m so excited to cover this on Wednesday! And I“m excited to hear some of your predictions, so be sure to sound off below!
  3. Welcome to the premiere of a brand new Pokémon feature debuting here on Game Podunk! Stay tuned for future entries coming every Friday morning. ---------------------------- First Entry- Generations I“m not sure where to begin what I“m about to start writing. Maybe I“ll have you all picture the beginning of the Pokémon anime where Ash Ketchum vows to become a Pokémon Master. I should draw attention to how the camera pans towards his hands and his turning his cap sideways for dramatic effect. Goodness knows I was that... endearing when I first turned ten and vowed the same thing. Give or take a year, my Pokémon journey began at the same age as his. Many of us born in the late eighties or early nineties were all hypnotized by . Pokémon Red & Blue Version were many a child“s first exposure to role-playing games, world-building and possibly the word “endeavor”. I had such grand visions when I was younger. I“d catch as many as I could and learn about Mew and write stories expanding the world of Pokémon far beyond the old Game Boy“s grayscale screen, or even the anime. Before I“d purchased strategy guides and learned all there was to know, I made up the Pokémon Dragonite (even down to that specific name) that happened to fit the description of the real one down to a tee... except mine was blue, not orange. To talk about Pokémon as a series is to instantly ignite the nostalgia of childhood, at least for me. Only I“m not eleven anymore. I“m just under a month away from celebrating my twenty-seventh birthday. And some sixteen years later, I“ve fully realized the dreams of Ash Ketchum, and of my younger self, despite the total number of Pokémon now stretching far beyond the original 150. I blame my girlfriend for creating this monster... er, Pokémon Master. Nine years ago, when we first started dating, I knew she was “the one” when a bunch of Pikachu plushies happened to fall from the top of her closet when I first saw her place. She doesn“t play games all that much, but after that, we“d found our first major gaming-thing in common. And we both started playing through the Game Boy Advance games—me with FireRed and her with Sapphire. While her mission was just to get to the end of the story and explore the world with her favorites from childhood, I found myself making the same “promises” to myself as I did when I was a kid that day. My personal definition of Pokémon has expanded far beyond the typical childhood nostalgia to include various pieces and parts of my relationship, and where we were in life at the time of our last Pokémon journey. Plenty of you have various memories and meanings associated with the various Pokémon Generations. If you“re reading this because you“re as big into the series as I am, but for completely different reasons, I want to know what yours are! As we“re fast approaching the release of the next Pokémon games (and before anyone asks, yes, my lady will be playing through Alpha Sapphire. Crazy stuff!), I want to turn “Jonathan writes about Pokémon” into a regular thing: musings, impressions, and tips from someone who has poured thousands of hours across the main (and side) games. Hopefully I“ll get all of us Podunk Pokémaniacs talking and helping each other out! So, what does Pokémon mean to you? Is it something you just play for fun, or do you have a handful of warm, fuzzy stories from youth that will rival my own? Rest assured, no matter what your story is, it all has a place here! Nothing captures “the magic” of Pokémon, in my opinion, than this Zapdos trophy description from Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS. And just to reward the first person to read this whole thing, here“s a code for the Special Demo Version of Pokémon Omega Ruby & Alpha Sapphire: A05PJETB0GCLBU6B. You can redeem the code by going to Settings/Other and then clicking "Redeem Download Code" on the Nintendo eShop on 3DS! If you“re the lucky guy or lady who redeems it, be sure to let me know!
  4. Pac-Man and the Ghostly Adventures is in a bit of an odd spot - it's a licensed game, which usually means trouble, but the show it's based on is itself based on an established gaming icon. Does it overcome the stigma of licensed games to earn a spot in the collection of every Pac-Maniac, or is this ghostly adventure haunted by its status as a tie-in product? Read on to find out! Developer: Bandai Namco Games, Monkey Bar Games Publisher: Bandai Namco Games Platform(s): Wii U, Playstation 3, Xbox 360, Nintendo 3DS, PC via Steam Release Date: October 25, 2013 ESRB: E10+ Review is based on the PC/Steam version Pac-Man and the Ghostly Adventures is a 3D platformer based on the DisneyXD television show of the same name. In the game, Betrayus, whose name pretty much tells you everything you need to know, is up to his old tricks and aims to take over Pac-World and turn all its residents into ghosts! Only Pac-Man and his friends can stop him, but you already knew that. This time around, Pac-Man must traverse various dangerous worlds looking for stone tablets that, once deciphered, may hold the key to stopping Betrayus' villainy once and for all! Of course, if you're like me and have never seen an episode of the show, none of that will really matter. The characters (besides Pac-Man, Inky, Blinky, Pinky, and Clyde) were all new to me, and some references to events from the show went over my head. If you are a fan of the show, you'll certainly get a kick out of these, but if not, then you'll be left wondering what they're talking about - thankfully, other than the winks and nods, the story is self-contained enough that anyone could follow it regardless of prior knowledge. Story cutscenes are also generally few and far between and really only serve to fill in the gaps between levels, so the real focus will be on the hopping and chomping you'll be doing. Ghostly Adventures takes you through different worlds as you run, jump, chomp enemies, and gather collectibles as well as the ever-present pellets and fruit the series is known for. You'll also come across various power-ups ranging from the ability to throw fireballs to puffing up Pac-Man like a balloon to float through windy areas and reach new heights. The power-ups play into the levels by requiring you to use them to traverse certain areas or defeat certain enemies, and you'll often use more than one powerup in a single level (or even in a single area of a level) which keeps the gameplay from getting too stale over the rather short course of the campaign. You'll also need them for the majority of the boss fights, which pop up in different levels rather than always at the end of a world, so they'll keep you on your toes. When not partaking in perilous platforming and performing powered-up poundings on poltergeists (try saying that five times fast) there's a hub world to play around in the form of Pac-Man's school, where you can converse with characters and play a few arcade-style games that you'll unlock over time, none of which, for some reason, are the original Pac-Man. While the game works fine as a 3D platformer - which makes sense because it's not even new ground for Pac-Man - it also falls prey to some of the pitfalls of the genre, notably a finicky camera that sometimes struggles to show you where you're going. Thankfully, the controls work well enough that you can often recover before plummeting to your doom, and if not, the game is generous with extra lives, which can be picked up in the levels or obtained after defeating enough enemies. You won't really need them that much, though, because most of your deaths will come by accident rather than from the enemies, since, as a game based on a children's show, it doesn't offer up a whole lot of challenge. Some of the later levels can get a little hectic, but you'll never see anything on the same scale as, say, a late-game level in one of the 3D Super Mario games. Also, in comparison to Super Mario, the game's physics, level layouts, and general gameplay all have their own feel to set Ghostly Adventures apart from the competition, so fortunately you're not likely to suffer from déjà vu during your playtime. Aside from the campaign, there's also a multiplayer mode, but it's local-only so I was unable to try it out. From a visual standpoint, the game is generally bright and colorful, which is typical of 3D platformers but welcome nonetheless in today's gaming climate. Each area also has its own distinct look, and there's a good bit of set dressing to really give each world its own personality. While the game isn't a graphical powerhouse - and indeed, barely looks the part of a seventh-generation console game - it doesn't really need to be one, either, so it's not likely to bother even older players. SInce the show is done in CGI, the game is able to simply emulate the same three-dimensional look, which helps tie the game to its source material. On the audio side of things, the game features a fun, bouncy soundtrack that incorporates some tunes from Pac-Man's past as well as the show itself, a nice touch for fans of both. The sound effects in the game are mostly pulled from the arcade game as well, though there are a few new ones that work just fine too. The game also features full voice acting, though soundalikes were used in place of the show's original cast. Pac-Man and the Ghostly Adventures is a fun and colorful platformer with a laid-back attitude, with all the key elements of the genre coming together to form an enjoyable romp through Pac-World. However, a couple of things hold it back from true greatness - foremost is the game's length, which clocks in around 5 hours. The other is that, while the game is certainly distinct from other 3D platformers and stands on its own, it still doesn't do anything new or particularly interesting with the genre. Add to the fact that this game is mostly aimed at the younger crowd, and you've got a recipe for a good rental, but not necessarily a good purchase. There's certainly a lot of fun to be had, but there's just not enough to the game to really chomp into, leaving a ghostly trace that will haunt players with a hunger for more. Score: 7/10 TL;DR version - Pac-Man and the Ghostly Adventures is a fun platformer that manages to stand apart from the likes of Mario, and also manages to escape from the general awfulness of licensed games. There's a lot to like for fans of the show and even those who haven't watched it may still find the game enjoyable, however, the game's short length and lack of true challenge for hardcore gamers keeps it from being a truly significant experience. It might be worth a rental if you're hankering for a 3D platformer that doesn't star a portly plumber, but I honestly can't recommend a purchase.
  5. Jonathan Higgins

    Review: Fantasy Life

    Developer: Level-5, 1-UP Studio Publisher: Nintendo Platforms: 3DS Release Date: October 24, 2014 ESRB: E 10+ Official Site When I opened up my package containing Fantasy Life for Nintendo 3DS, Bayonetta 2 was tucked right underneath it, as part of the same shipment. Just weeks prior, I“d picked up Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS, and just a few weeks later comes the Holiday 2014 deluge of titles featuring everything from Pokémon Omega Ruby & Alpha Sapphire to Kingdom Hearts HD 2.5 ReMIX, and even other life simulation games like Story of Seasons. Determined to give the game a fair chance, I started things off, got a Life, and dredged through a lengthy tutorial. During my first few hours with the game, I decided it was middling at best; I was ready to let it wash out to sea among the wave of new releases seemingly destined to overshadow it. But... now that I“ve spent just under twenty five hours with the game, let me say—Life has a way of proving you wrong sometimes. And I“m going to spend the next little while hopefully convincing some of you to change your tune, if you have doubts about what Fantasy Life has to offer. While the pedigree of Yoshitaka Amano (known for his designs from Final Fantasy VI, among other games) and Nobuo Uematsu (renowned Final Fantasy composer) may be enough to pique your interest, there“s certainly more to the game than what“s on the surface level. Fantasy Life takes place in the world of Reveria, where the player—a fledging young boy or girl—must take up a Life for himself or herself and go on a carefree, whimsical adventure to find out what Life has to offer. And there are twelve different Lives to lead: Four are combat-based, like Mercenary and Wizard. Three focus on gathering, like Miner and Woodcutter. And five feature crafting, like Alchemist and Blacksmith. Regardless of the one the player chooses, the story plays out the same. And my goodness, does the game“s tutorial make it seem like the pacing slows to a crawl there in the beginning. But if you“re willing to look past the monotony of the first two hours or so, you start to realize that things pick up a little bit. The world of Reveria starts to grow on you! The graphics and designs of the world as a whole and the things (whether townspeople or gruesome beast) that populate it show off a unique charm that fans of Amano will pick up on over time. In terms of its design sense, imagine a world whose environments are as refreshing as Final Fantasy IX or Ni No Kuni (also from Level-5). Everything is colorful, and whether we“re talking in-game scenery or the beautifully hand-drawn cutscenes, it“s all immersive and whimsical. The soundtrack isn't necessarily Uematsu at his best, but all the music absolutely suits the world. And none of it felt dull or repetitive. I played through the entire main story as a Paladin, and stuck with that Life until I Mastered it. But the way I played through the game isn“t necessarily the set, correct way. After the initial tutorial, the player is given the option to change to whatever Life he or she chooses on a whim. You can skip the meaty introductory tutorial for each Life and build multiple stats and characteristics as you see fit throughout the game. Or you can stick with one Life throughout the game, and switch to another after you“ve Mastered its challenges. After spending almost twenty hours in a combat-based class, switching to Miner felt more natural than I thought it would. A lot of the game“s overall mechanics don“t necessarily change, even though one“s Life is never set in stone. Whether I“m tackling a powerful foe as a Paladin, or a powerful... chunk of rock as a Miner, the various themes of the game, and the ambiance of adventure, are always consistent. I knew Fantasy Life was growing on me after a while, but I still had this sort of internal struggle trying to decide whether the game was just decent, or if it had qualities that could let it stand on its own instead of being drowned by its contemporaries. One of those good qualities has to do with the fact that the game lets you move at your own pace. Want to spend twenty hours building your perfect home (with all its furnishings and the like) as a woodcutter instead of going through the main story? You“re free to do so, and the game won“t ever penalize you for it. The quests of your Butterfly companion (which aren't really demanding, mind you) are required to advance the main story and open up the world of Reveria to you, but it“s not as though the world will end if you take your time with Life. Want to go through Life with friends instead of doing it all alone? You“re free to do that too, as the game has online and local multiplayer that“s available not long after the dreaded beginning tutorial. It“s more than a little hidden, but once you get the ball rolling, everything is pretty seamless. You could choose to participate in Ally Mode, which broadcasts your achievements to your friends, who you must go into a menu and individually select...and hardly anyone will have this feature turned on because it“s not done for you automatically. Or you could get in on some Multiplayer, when you and a buddy probably do a lot of talking offline before agreeing to jump online together. Companionship is definitely there. But it“s not as seamless as it should be, for a game that could benefit from going through Life together. Still, the aspect of Fantasy Life that impressed me the most is the care, attention and humor given to its script in North America. The story may not be some epic adventure that“s destined to change your life forever. But its sense of humor is definitely there... and will surely appeal to the handful of you who have found my constant allusions, puns about Life, and the like entertaining so far. It“s so cheesy, I think it belongs in Wisconsin. Absolutely awful figurative language and puns like the one I just told are littered throughout the script, and will hit you when you least expect them to as you advance through the game“s main story. I found myself chuckling for some of the beginning, and almost rolling on the floor laughing by the end. Fantasy Life expects you to embrace some of its tropes, and absolutely turns others on their heads. The script and story are fun and phenomenal—far more than icing on the cake for me. At the end of the day, because of its charm, I can confidently say I was wrong about Fantasy Life. If you“re expecting it to be lost at sea among this year“s other heavy-hitting releases, it very well could be. But I hope those of you on the fence about Fantasy Life give it a chance in due time. The tale of Reveria may be one of the most charming adventures I“ve experienced this year. Life as that game presents it has definitely left a positive mark on me at the end of the day, instead of taking its toll. Pros: + Phenomenal script, absolutely dripping with absurd humor and attention to detail that will appeal to all ages. + Move at whatever pace you like; this is definitely a game that can last forever if you let it. + Very charming environments and characters, well-suited to a fantasy story. Cons: - The beginning tutorial feels so slow that it might leave a good handful unwilling to give it a chance in the beginning. Some bits of the game seem a little too slow. - Things like Multiplayer, StreetPass functionality and more exist, but they're a little buried. They're not nearly as seamless as they could be, either. Overall Score: 8 (out of 10) Great Fantasy Life may be one of the most charming adventures you'll experience this year. Disclosure: This game was reviewed via a copy purchased personally by the author
  6. Ladies and gentlemen, Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS comes out tomorrow/tonight at midnight! That's the highlight of this week's Nintendo Download. Like with the Japanese release, fans planning on purchasing the game at launch can save time by downloading the free software update (version 1.0.2) on the eShop in advance. The update, which is required for online play will be available starting at 9 AM PT/12 PM ET. What else is new this week? The Virtual Console on Wii U gets Castlevania Dracula X later today. Castlevania: Circle of the Moon is coming to the Wii U Virtual Console next week. And Castlevania: Harmony of Dissonance is coming a week later on October 16th. Harvest Moon 2 is coming to the Virtual Console on 3DS on October 16th as well. The Wii U eShop gets 99Seconds and Red Riding Hood, respectively. And the 3DS eShop gets Tenkai Knights Brave Battle and a demo for Color Zen. Lastly, in terms of sales: Poker Dice Solitaire Future is available for 0.69 (from 0.99) until October 30th. Jet Rocket II: The Wrath of Taikai is available for $5.99 (from $8.99) until October 23rd. And Tappingo is available for $1.99 (from $2.99) until October 16th. Will you be picking up Smash for 3DS tonight? Planning on grabbing anything else revealed this week? Be sure to let us know! Source: Press Release
  7. Do you have your 3DS on? Well go ahead and download the new update, and get more StreetPasses than ever before! The system's latest update allows you to grab StreetPasses from Nintendo Zones in your area, making it easier for the more spread out population of the U.S. to get some StreetPass action. How does it work? Well, whenever you go to a Nintendo Zone, it'll take your StreetPass information and store it. At the same time, it'll take the information of the Mii it was holding, and give it to you. So, visiting a Nintendo Zone won't get you a ton of StreetPasses all at once, but you'll only get one per Zone visit. If you want to see what Nintendo Zones are in your area, check this page. Do you think you'll get more StreetPasses with this new update?
  8. You might not know what CowBoom is or what its about, so please allow me to clue you in. CowBoom is a website owned by Best Buy that sells used and returned electronics for less than new prices. While usually these lowered prices are nothing to get excited about, CowBoom is quite well known for their daily deals. And today the daily deal just happens to be video game consoles. Sure they're used, and they might not come with everything a new system comes with, but nobody is going to be able to beat some of their prices. Nintendo 3DS (red,black,blue) $80 Playstation Vita Wifi Console $140 Playstation 3 160GB Slim $130 Xbox 360 Slim 250GB $120 Nintendo DSi-DSi XL (multiple colors) $60 Xbox 360 (Core Console & 20GB) $80 Nintendo Wii $50 Playstation Portable (1001-3001) $45 While these prices are pretty great you need to remember that what you're buying is used. It may not come in perfect condition, but it is guaranteed to work. If it doesn't work then you can get a free return and refund set up with the website's customer support, but it doesn't usually come to that. Also since these systems are all technically daily deals you usually have to wait for the console you want to appear on the front page, but thankfully there is a way around this as long as you have a little bit of patience. On the daily deal page you will see one of two different options. The first one being "Stand by! We're loading today's next deal!" if you see that, just refresh the screen until you see the "Add to cart" option. Even if you don't want the item, try to add it to your cart. If it does add to your cart just remove it and try again. After a few tries the website will say "Sorry! Looks like someone beat you to this deal. Why not choose one of these items below" It will then list four random items included in the daily deal. Just keep this up until you find the console you want and add it to your cart. It might take a few attempts, but getting a 3DS for nearly $80 off is totally worth it to me. Good luck everybody, and here's the link to the sale below. CowBoom's Daily Deals
  9. Jordan Haygood

    Epic Mickey: Power of Illusion 8

    From the album: Epic Mickey: Power of Illusion Gallery

    Scrooge McDuck makes everything more epic.

    © Disney

  10. Jordan Haygood

    Epic Mickey: Power of Illusion 7

    From the album: Epic Mickey: Power of Illusion Gallery

    Scrooge McDuck makes everything more epic.

    © Disney

  11. Jordan Haygood

    Epic Mickey: Power of Illusion 6

    From the album: Epic Mickey: Power of Illusion Gallery

    Scrooge McDuck makes everything more epic.

    © Disney

  12. Jordan Haygood

    Epic Mickey: Power of Illusion 1

    From the album: Epic Mickey: Power of Illusion Gallery

    Scrooge McDuck makes everything more epic.

    © Disney

  13. Jordan Haygood

    Epic Mickey: Power of Illusion 2

    From the album: Epic Mickey: Power of Illusion Gallery

    All you have to do is draw a clock.

    © Disney

  14. Jordan Haygood

    Epic Mickey: Power of Illusion 3

    From the album: Epic Mickey: Power of Illusion Gallery

    Peter Pan likes your style.

    © Disney

  15. Jordan Haygood

    Epic Mickey: Power of Illusion 4

    From the album: Epic Mickey: Power of Illusion Gallery

    Drawing weapons allows you to use them in battle.

    © Disney

  16. Jordan Haygood

    Epic Mickey: Power of Illusion 5

    From the album: Epic Mickey: Power of Illusion Gallery

    Beauty Mickey and the Beast

    © Disney

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