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Found 5 results

  1. Laddie13

    Game of the Year 2017: Laddie's Picks

    What a year for gaming 2017 turned out to be. My personal experience can be best summed up with the idiom, "I bit off more than I could chew." So many games that I anticipated being on this list didn’t make it for no other reason than I never got around to playing or finishing them. A year after its release, I discovered Overwatch and it took up so much of my 2017 gaming time. There were also those early months in the year when I experienced a bit of gaming funk that I blame on the game that sits at the top of my list. Everything I played after was a disappointment, and unfortunately, Mass Effect Andromeda, Prey, Nioh, and Nier Automata became casualties of my slump. Once I got my gaming legs back, I went on a rampage. Something I also noticed in 2017: games were being sold with nice discounts almost immediately after they released. The frequent sales on PSN committed the biggest crimes against my wallet, and while I greatly appreciated them, I now find myself with more games than time. Before I get into my games of the year, I’d like to mention a couple notable games that I had to leave off. Wolfenstein 2 would have made the list for sure but I barely had a chance to play any of it. I also excluded Victor Vran, because it was previously released on PC before making its way to console this year. If you are a fan of Diablo, I highly recommend Victor Vran. Farpoint, which I think aside from a few wonky control issues I had (I did not buy the PSVR aim controller) and the temperamental camera settings is a killer app for PSVR and I loved the immersive feel that felt like being in a sci-fi movie. However, my 'cat of destruction' decided that chewing the PSVR wires was a good idea, thus shutting down my virtual reality life temporarily. By the way, cat-chewed wires are not covered by the warranty! One game you won’t find on my list is The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild. I tried to play this game on several occasions and based my Switch purchase almost solely on it. It just didn’t resonate with me. In fact, the game frustrates me more than anything. (Editor's note: Laddie wasn't the only one to feel that way about Breath of the Wild; there's a similar story about it in Jon's list as well.) So here it is, my mostly predictable favorite games of 2017. 10. Lawbreakers Lawbreakers is kind of a mix between Overwatch and a slower, less mobile Titanfall. I know it didn’t appeal to -- or even retain -- much of a player-base, but I enjoyed my time with it. There was definitely a steep learning curve, especially using the zero gravity portions of the maps, but Lawbreakers was a great concept, and I admire Boss Key for their dedication to the game post-release. I’m sure a game that uses the pre-made hero model is probably easier to balance, but people like to customize their characters and -- unlike Overwatch -- there’s only a handful of characters to select from. The game offered me (at a discounted price) a month of pure shooter fun that felt fresh while still retaining the basics of an arena shooter. At launch, the game lacked a team deathmatch mode, which was probably a bad move as it’s the favorite game mode in most shooters, especially for the less competitive players. As the population dwindled, it became more frustrating not only due to the long searches for games but the uneven team balance that matchmaking offers when so few are playing. I’d love to see the game have a resurgence, but that likely won’t happen unless a sequel happens, and I would definitely support that. 9. Assassins Creed: Origins The only reason this game is so far down on my list is I am still playing it. I don’t usually include games I’ve not finished on lists like this but barring any drastic turn to being terrible, this game belongs here, and probably even much higher up. I’ve never been much of a fan of the Assassins Creed series, but I love the ancient Egyptian setting and I bought it while it was on sale during Black Friday week. Granted, its been awhile since I played an AC game, but I don’t recall the experience being this awesome. Origins moves away from the stealth action-adventure genre and charges straight into RPG territory with an excellent progression system, very expansive world, and side quests galore, which includes raiding tombs for loot that would make Lara Croft envious. Sure, there is a skill tree, but I love how protagonist Bayak automatically transcends into a badass the more you level up. I’m not one for stealth combat, and provided you do not take on missions that are way out of your pay grade, you can go loud and take down entire armies with a mixture of various melee weapons and bow and arrow. Combat is smooth, intuitive, and fun. If that’s not enough, you can climb pyramids and pet cats. 8. Knack 2 Knack holds a special place in my gaming history as the first game I completed on PS4. Knack 2 improves on the action-adventure/ platformer by giving Knack what he desperately needed, more moves and abilities. There’s even an in-game joke that mocks the old Knack’s lack of cool abilities that I found incredibly endearing considering the game was a bit of an internet joke, so it’s nice to see Sony can poke fun at itself with the rest of them. As a series, Knack has a bit of an identity crisis as to what it wants to be, but at least the sequel has a bit more direction. Through the use of relics, Knack has the ability to change sizes from very tiny to a twenty-foot giant. It doesn’t take a lot of strategy to figure out how to use this ability to your advantage and much of the platforming elements feel familiar but why not just embrace it for what it is: a flawed but entertaining and fun experience. I take a lot of flak for defending this series, but if loving Knack is wrong, I don’t want to be right! 7. The Evil Within 2 I didn’t ever get around to playing the first game, but I was wrapped up in the moment of Halloween and wanted something scary to play at the time this released. The Evil Within 2 gives you a brief history lesson at the beginning, but if you are worried about skipping the first game like I did, IGN has a great video that sums up the Evil Within in 5 minutes. At times, The Evil Within 2 feels a lot like The Last of Us in its combat and crafting, especially the stealthier combat aspects. My biggest issue with the game was the bad dialog and underwhelming characters, but the story overall is intriguing kind of Silent Hill meets the Matrix with a super creepy main villain. The semi-open world and the side quests gave the game a nice change of pace for the horror genre. I found myself going back to replay sections of the game looking for things I missed, something I don’t usually do with horror games. I bought Evil Within 2 on a whim and didn’t expect much from it, let alone it being one of my favorite games of the year. 6. Call of Duty: WWII I think I was one of the few people that did not want Call of Duty (or COD) to go back to World War II, let alone return to boots-on-the-ground combat. The beta further confirmed my feelings as I couldn’t get a feel for it in the few matches I tried out. Yet, I was still intrigued and had actually thought COD Advanced Warfare was the best COD MP in awhile so I wanted to give Sledgehammer another shot. A funny thing happened: the more I played, I started to adjust to the slower pace and lack of wall-running and super-jumps or -slides, and I began to get it. Graphically, it’s gorgeous; I’m playing on the PS4 Pro but I’m sure it is just as stunning on a standard console. Most of my playtime has been spent in PvP multiplayer, but I did complete the campaign and it was heartfelt and at times very poignant. However, everyone knows the heart of COD is multiplayer, and while I would have like a few more maps, it’s the best most balanced MP Call of Duty has been in years. Hopefully, it stays that way and they won’t introduce overpowered weapons that are found only in loot boxes. As it is now, the epic guns are the same as the standard weapons but offer an XP boost and a different look. True to its word, COD WWII brings the series back to form, I guess you can go home again. 5. Uncharted: The Lost Legacy Being that the video game industry is still mostly a boys club, I have to give kudos to Naughty Dog for featuring two kick-ass women to star in its first post-Drake Uncharted content. We were introduced to Chloe and Nadine in other Uncharted games and I think they were a good choice to star in their own story (even if it is technically considered Uncharted 4 DLC despite it being a stand-alone story that doesn’t require Uncharted 4). I might actually prefer Lost Legacy over Uncharted 4, as it seems to fit in better with the pace and tone of the series, whereas I found UC4 moved incredibly slow at times. Chloe’s combat style is different than Drake’s but Lost Legacy still has the cinematic feel of Uncharted, complete with lush locations, intrigue, mythology, and of course, puzzles. I’d say the game took about 7-8 hours to complete, and if for whatever reason you did not buy Uncharted 4, Lost Legacy contains full access to multiplayer and survival mode. I don’t blame Naughty Dog for wrapping up Drake’s storyline, but I hope we get more Uncharted games in the future. And as Lost Legacy has successfully showcased, I’m hopeful and confident the series can survive without Nathan Drake. 4. Destiny 2 My love/hate relationship with Destiny continues with the sequel that gets most of what was wrong with the first right. Destiny 2 starts with an attack on the Last City that destroys the tower and drains all light from the guardians. This sense of loss is driven home by the realization that after grinding the first Destiny game for three years, you must start the process all over again. The old addiction returns, and once you are back in the fray you think it won’t be that bad this time until you hit about level 280, and then the grind is real. I will say that through the use of the newly added challenges and milestones and the guided raids or nightfall, even the loneliest of wolves has a chance to level up and get in on the events that grant the best loot. The way Bungie tells the story and lore in Destiny 2 is also a big improvement over the first game as most of the story unfolds naturally through gameplay or cutscenes and not on Bungie.net. That’s not to say the Destiny 2 plot is going to be remembered for its depth, but it has charm and our favorite fire-team, Ikora, Zavala, and if course Cayde 6 all make a return. Destiny 2 builds on the vague backstory of the first game but is much more simplistic. Your job is to stop the bad man Ghaul who is responsible for capturing the Traveler. I still don’t fully understand what the Traveler is, but I know I must save it. Destiny 2’s strength lies in its gameplay, shooting aliens is rarely this much fun, and the locations are absolutely stunning. Even if you never touch the PvP, Strikes, or Raids, there’s plenty to do and explore in the story portion. As I was in the first game I’m disappointed in the PvP Portion, its as if Bungie who created one of the greatest multiplayer experiences with Halo simply forgot how to balance a multiplayer game. Admittedly, I have been suffering from a little bit of Destiny 2 burnout, but with the first expansion just released I imagine I will be back on that Destiny grind soon enough. 3. HellBlade: Senua’s Sacrifice Where should I start? This game is not only a technical masterpiece, its an emotional rollercoaster ride into mental illness and drives home the point that there is hope. Hellblade: Senua's Sacrifice is inspired by Norse and Celtic mythology and is part hack-and-slash, action adventure, puzzler, and survival horror. If you haven’t played this game, I highly recommend you do so. I will tread lightly here so I won’t spoil anything for those who have not played it. Its genre-bending gameplay is surprisingly intuitive and smooth. Senua has an ability called 'focus' that is triggered by effectively blocking attacks or dodging them. The game doesn’t feature a HUD, but the voices in Senua’s head (or 'Furies' as they are referred to often) help guide you or inform you where your next attack is coming from. Her attacks are basic and there is very little weapon upgrading but Senua naturally gets better, or maybe you do. Ninja Theory consulted neuroscientists, mental health specialists, and nonprofit organizations to help them properly portray and represent the horrors of mental illness. The use of 3D sound drives the voices/Furies so much so that it becomes an integral part of the experience. The level designers also did a great job of illustrating the nightmare world Senua’s mind has become. It’s often a tough game to play but it’s worth it. In the end, Senua defeats the darkness and her past, stops blaming herself, and embraces it. It’s ok to not be ok. 2. Hob This game only came to my attention shortly before it released but it easily became one of my favorite games of the year. It was developed by Runic games, known for the excellent Torchlight series. My first impression of the game was one of intrigue, but also frustration. There is no tutorial to hold your hand, and no dialogue to give you direction, you are simply thwarted into a world that looks as if technology and nature are at war. You play as a tiny non-gender specific character that I’ve assumed to be called, Hob. Early on, Hob loses an arm which is then replaced with a robot arm that is upgraded with things you find along the way. After first acquiring the robot arm I didn’t know what to do or where to go, it was looking like the game over for me almost as soon as it began. Then I started exploring my very beautiful surroundings (seriously the art and level designers at Runic are amazing) and learned I could chop down trees that were obscuring passages to where I needed to be. From then on, I explored everything, and then even the map started to make sense. There are things to find, puzzles to solve, and even light hack-and-slash battles. Often, you must revisit areas due to new tech upgrades to the robot arm. Despite its lack of dialogue, Hob is an emotional experience, even if the story is often mysterious, or more likely subjective. I was incredibly saddened to hear Runic Games was shut down shortly after Hob released dashing my dreams of a sequel or even DLC. In many ways, Hob is the game I hoped Breath of the Wild would be. RIP Runic Games. 1. Horizon Zero Dawn 2017 might well be remembered as the year of the “nasty woman,” so it’s fitting that the game that captured my heart the most featured a female protagonist. I still remember the first time this game was shown off, Guerrilla, you had me at 'robot dinosaur'. I was super hyped for this game, which often results in the actual product being a letdown; however, Horizon Zero Dawn exceeded my expectations. Gameplay is so smooth and the post-apocalyptic universe it is set in is stunning; by the way, if you aren’t playing HZD on PS4 Pro, you’re doing it wrong! When the game released, I started playing it right at midnight and didn’t stop until about 8 AM the next morning. When I wasn’t playing it I was working or sleeping but still thinking about it. A game hadn’t got under my skin like that for quite some time. I recently went back to HZD to play the very expansive DLC, The Frozen Wilds. I actually thought about including the DLC as a separate entry but decided to just combine it as the overall experience that is Horizon Zero Dawn. Our ginger hero Aloy (voiced by Ashley Burch) is strong, independent, caring, and intelligent. We are very aware of her femininity, but it’s never objectified. Aloy is a great character who happens to be female, not because of it. The thing I admire most about Aloy is her ability to forgive and not be angry or bitter about the cruelties that were inflicted upon her as a child. Aloy is an instant icon of video games and one that I hope is around for generations to come. As for gameplay, it’s damn near perfect! Battling the robot wildlife is intuitive, and each type has their own weaknesses and strengths. I had a blast trying to figure which weapons and ammo type paired best with each type, and for once I even enjoyed stealth takedowns. The story at times had me worried it was going to end somewhat convoluted but it all makes sense at the end of the game. I’ve played Horizon Zero Dawn for 125 hours (including the Frozen Wilds), and I’m looking forward to 125 more.
  2. HAIL 9000

    Game of the Year 2017: Hailee's Picks

    2017 has been a huge year for games. I’ve never had so much trouble narrowing my list down to just ten, and even then it still feels like there were so many great games that I didn’t even get a chance to play. On top of that, this year I’ve felt fortunate to find several games that have probably become some of my all-time favorites. With all that said, let’s get started! 10. Destiny 2 Destiny 2 is a game that landed a spot on my list just because of how much fun I had with it. I never played the first Destiny because: a) I heard those voice clip compilations of Peter Dinklage as the Ghost; and I had kind of written it off as “not really my thing”. I gave Destiny 2 a chance mostly because my friends were playing it, and I’m really glad that I did. The game blends elements of an MMO and an FPS in a way that feels pretty unique and captures a lot of the good aspects of both. I played the entire campaign co-op as a Warlock and it was a lot of fun, both because I enjoyed playing with other people, and because I enjoyed the way my class affected the gameplay. Also, the world feels alive in a special way, like how you can run into and join groups of players doing public events while chasing after a quest. And, as a small perk that feeds into my personal interests, there’s great character customization and cool outfits. Another nice perk of Destiny 2 that I wasn’t really expecting is that the world and lore are quite interesting, although I’m somewhat frustrated that you have to do some digging both in and outside the game to understand them. Additionally, the game had a cast of likable characters that added to the experience. Plus the world itself was beautiful and fun to be in. All things considered, Destiny 2 was a pleasant surprise for me which I enjoyed more than I expected to. 9. Yakuza Kiwami Click here to read GP's Official Review In an unexpected turn of events, there are not one but TWO Yakuza games on my list this year (more about this later). As such, it’s kind of tough to write about Kiwami without comparing it to Yakuza 0 so if you want to skip ahead and read that one first I wouldn’t blame you. While a lot of my newfound love for this series comes from it being unabashedly sentimental and ridiculous, Kiwami has something extra special: Haruka, AKA the light of my life. The relationship between Kiryu and Haruka is what really makes this game. It’s just incredibly sweet to see Kiryu, a professional criminal hardened by ten years in jail, spending his first days of freedom looking after an orphaned little girl, helping her feed a puppy, and cheering for her at karaoke. Since Yakuza 0 is the only other Yakuza game I’ve played, I’m really looking forward to seeing Haruka grow up through the rest of the series. In addition to Kiryu being the world’s best dad, Kiwami has so much good melodrama and ridiculous plot twists. I also really appreciate some of the new additions in the remake, like the extra cutscenes explaining what happened to Nishiki and the Majima Anywhere System (which is delightful, if sometimes a little annoying). Kiwami is great, but the reason this one ranked so much lower than Yakuza 0 is because of its relative lack of content. The sidequests felt pretty lackluster and the combat less complex than in 0, which is to be expected. But all things considered they did a nice job with the remake, and it feels natural to jump to it after starting with 0, especially since 0 provides additional context to better inform your understanding of Kiwami’s characters and their relationships. 8. Rakuen Rakuen was a pleasant surprise that sort of snuck up on me this year. It’s unique, visually beautiful, and -- as one might expect from Laura Shigihara after her work on To the Moon -- it has a fantastic soundtrack. Taking all that into account, I think the place where Rakuen shines the brightest is with its story and characters, and the way that it presents them to you. In the game, you play as a boy in a hospital, who is accompanied by his mother for most of the game. Through top-down adventure gameplay, you get to know the other residents of the hospital both through your interactions with them in the real world and a beautiful fantasy world which stands in stark contrast to the drab interior of the hospital. Rakuen also features no combat and largely no sense of immediate peril, which allows the player to focus on what the game wants to share through its characters. Rakuen deals with some heavy themes and is quite sad at times, but it handles them in a way that is heartfelt and thoughtful. And despite that sadness, there’s a strong focus on the importance of being kind, gentle, and caring for others. All in all, Rakuen is an earnest and lovely experience, and I hope it doesn’t get buried in the wave of releases this year. 7. Tacoma As a big fan of Gone Home, Tacoma was a game I was really anticipating this year. Although its basis is more or less the same as Gone Home - walk around an abandoned space and piece together the fragments of someone else’s story - Tacoma manages to be an experience that feels unique and different. The scope of the story in Tacoma feels bigger, and it’s not so much about the personal journey of one person, but about how people interact with each other. This is reflected not just in the writing, but also in the AR mechanic the player uses to uncover the story of the Tacoma crew. Rather than just uncovering a recording to experience once, the player must move through parts of a scene, rewinding and fast forwarding to capture everyone’s role in the event. However, even with the focus on more people, the recordings feel intimate and personal. There’s something special about getting to see how someone deals with a situation through multiple lenses, such as what they write home about, what they say to their loved ones, and what they do when they’re alone. These sequences feel very intimate even though the player is only a passive observer of them, and it’s refreshing to discover a story through the little details of how it impacts the people it’s happening to. The scope feels bigger not only because it deals with a whole cast as opposed to just one person, but also because Tacoma tackles some interesting sociological issues, and does so in part by exploring their impact on the lives of individuals. While it maybe didn’t impact me in the same way that Gone Home did, I still really enjoyed my time with Tacoma and its cast. 6. Pyre Supergiant Games is a developer that has carved out a pretty big space in my heart over the last couple years, so naturally I was pretty excited for their latest game. Even though I was a little wary of what looked like “sports” gameplay, they definitely didn’t let me down. As I expected, I loved the art direction, music, characters, and worldbuilding of Pyre. I’m always impressed with the way that Supergiant crafts worlds that are interesting, fully fleshed out, and unique. Pyre is especially great in this respect in that it gives you the freedom to revisit the lore at any time, both by collecting it all in an easily accessible tome and allowing you to hover over names and terms in spoken dialogue to get a brief refresher on who or what they are. The world is only improved by the fact that it’s populated with a lovely cast of characters who you get to know in all sorts of ways over the course of the game, including through the enjoyable banter between characters. In a slightly unexpected turn of events, I loved the gameplay of Pyre as well. To progress the story, the player must complete Rites which are sports-match-like challenges where you assemble a team of characters with a diverse set of skills to face off against another team. I got so into the Rites I was even doing the extra challenges and turning on difficulty modifiers, which is a bit out of character for me. Ultimately, the sports-like gameplay in Pyre wound up being just as unique and delightful as everything else. 5. The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild When I found out Breath of the Wild was going to be an open world game, I was definitely a little worried. In recent years there’s been a trend of tacking open worlds onto games that don’t really benefit from them simply because “that’s what the kids want these days”. For me, open world games have all been feeling similar to each other, and the exploration they offer is starting to feel more and more like a chore. However, Breath of the Wild managed to buck this trend entirely. The way the world was done felt both unique and consistent with the Legend of Zelda series. It was carefully considered and meticulously designed, and just walking around the landscape was a joy and a goal in itself rather than a means to an end. It was beautiful and had such a strong sense of place that I often found myself avoiding key places and events just to keep wandering. It was really exciting to see the series that initially got me into video games take such a big step forward and succeed so well. And even though it was such a big change of pace for the series, it still felt familiar to me, and still had the elements of the series that I’ve come to know and love for the past twenty years. With all that said, I do still love the more guided, linear Zelda experience, and I hope that Nintendo continues to try new things with the series rather than stick exclusively to the open world approach they took with this one. 4. Yakuza 0 Click here to read GP's Official Review I’ve always been a bit skeptical of the Yakuza series, but after being introduced to the series with Yakuza 0 I’m a true believer. Who knew a game about beating up goons as a tough-as-nails Yakuza with a bunch of goofy mini-games would actually tell a sweet heartfelt story? The soft side of Yakuza 0 is the core reason why I loved it so much. I found Majima’s half of the game in particular so touching that I even shed real grown-up tears about it in the epilogue. It was really refreshing to see a game that on the surface appears to be a punch fest steeped in absurd masculinity turn out to tell a story that’s actually sweet and sentimental. Of course, the game still has plenty of absurdity, and that’s the other big reason I love it. Yakuza 0 is absolutely ridiculous. Between the melodrama, outrageous fights and action sequences, and hilarious side quests and mini-games, the game is totally unafraid to be campy. In an era where it feels like there’s a push for big-budget, story-focused games to be deadly serious to prove just how artistic they can be, this absurdity felt refreshing. I think there’s a place for artistic seriousness, but I think there’s also a place for recruiting a chicken to work at your real estate agency and breakdance fighting. And to be honest, if the karaoke sequences in Yakuza 0 don’t prove video games are art than I don’t know what does. My only complaint about the game is that the combat can be quite repetitive, especially towards the end of the game, which I’ve come to understand is an issue with the series in general. But all things considered, Yakuza 0 seems like a great jumping off point for those new to the series, as it’s polished and fun and actually provides some pretty meaningful background for the first game. 3. Persona 5 Persona 5 was a shoo-in for my favorite game of 2017 just by virtue of it being the next entry in one of my favorite series, and the fact that I’ve waited for it for almost a decade. In a lot of ways it exceeded my expectations, but in some ways, it didn’t. To start off with the good: the combat and dungeon crawling are hugely improved. The combat mechanics are streamlined and feel more fun and the randomly generated floors have been replaced with handcrafted dungeons, which eliminate the tedium that was still lingering in Persona 3 and 4. As far as aesthetic and style go it’s absolutely fantastic, maybe my favorite in the series, and it has the most gorgeous UI ever. Additionally, it features my favorite premise and themes of any game in the series. Despite being my first Persona game since leaving teendom behind, the “screw you corrupt adults” theme still resonated with me. A game about bringing down corrupt teachers, businessmen, and politicians felt pretty darn topical this year. And while I utterly enjoyed myself playing Persona 5, and while the characters do have a special place in my heart, in several ways I think Persona 5 fumbled a bit with its writing, which is disappointing since that’s a huge part of why I love the series so much. The story occasionally felt poorly paced and poorly crafted, some of the main characters got sidelined and didn’t get the development they deserved for the sake of developing one-off throwaway villains, and the game seems to unwittingly contradict some of the points it’s trying to make. Despite all my complaints, I still enjoyed the plot quite a bit, and I may hold the writing to an unfair standard given my opinion of the rest of the series. But for me, the Persona series really rides on its story and characters, and while they were great in Persona 5, they were not fantastic, which is ultimately what held it back from becoming my game of the year. 2. Night in the Woods When I played Night in the Woods, I quickly proclaimed it my game of the year, and although it was dethroned it’s still very dear to me. It’s a game I’ve been anticipating since it was Kickstarted and I was so grateful that it did not let me down. With Night in the Woods, in a way, I came for the aesthetic and stayed for the social commentary and its thoughts and questions about life. It’s the only game that I’ve ever immediately played again after beating it once. Pretty much every part of the game resonated with me on a personal level, which I guess is no surprise since it’s being called “Millennial Animals: the Game”. The game and its themes are grounded in reality, nihilistic and sometimes tragic, but still hopeful. It takes on a lot of heavy, topical subjects, but in a way that feels realistic and avoids being pretentious. Not to mention it does so with some absolutely lovely writing that deftly weaves humor and seriousness in a way that feels unique but also authentic. All of this is conveyed through a wonderful cast of characters, all of whom are lovable, but not without their own faults and struggles. In addition to the main cast, Possum Springs is also full of side characters who you can talk to every day to string together meaningful little vignettes about their lives and the history of the town. And while I said I came for the aesthetic and stayed for the writing, the aesthetic is pretty killer too. Visually, the game is gorgeous. It feels like every screenshot could be printed and framed as its own work of art, and the soundtrack is fantastic, which makes exploring Possum Springs and finding all its secrets that much more enjoyable. 1. Nier: Automata In a turn of events that will not surprise a single person who’s ever spoken to me, my game of the year is Nier: Automata. I’ve had tempered enthusiasm for Automata ever since it was announced. Nier Gestalt had some fantastic writing, world-building, and my favorite game soundtrack of all time, yet I found the gameplay a little lacking. When I found out Platinum was going to be working on Automata, I was pretty darn excited. When the game finally came out though, it exceeded all my expectations. Nier: Automata has some of the most fun action gameplay in recent memory. This, coupled with a beautiful open world that’s fleshed out with meaningful sidequests make for a consistently great gameplay experience all the way through. I’m often compelled to turn the game back on just for the sake of being in that world again. Automata also has a fantastic score, a worthy follow-up to Gestalt (which I think still remains my favorite soundtrack of all time). However, where Automata really shines is in its writing -- in the profound questions it asks as well as the way in which it asks those questions and the way that it uses the medium of video games to lend to the story it wants to tell. I’m being deliberately vague because I’d hate to spoil this experience for anyone, and everyone should play Nier: Automata. I’d also like to give a special thank you here to all my dear friends who still speak to me after I’ve forced this game on them repeatedly all year. Nier: Automata is a profoundly sad game, but it’s not without hope. I’ve never found myself so deeply moved by a game before and it is hard for me to remember the last time I loved a game this much. And so, naturally, it’s my game of the year, and has certainly earned its place as one of my favorite games of all time.
  3. Co-Op and fun with Haxton! Come check out some #Destiny2 fun on my #Twitch stream tonight! https://www.twitch.tv/royzoga123
  4. Sorry for the delay, we're live now! Check out the awesome shield lobbing #Destiny2 action on my #Twitch stream! https://www.twitch.tv/royzoga123
  5. Come check out the new #Destiny2 in all its glory. Which class should I play?! Regardless, come watch on #Twitch https://www.twitch.tv/royzoga123
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