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Found 4 results

  1. Jason Clement

    Game of the Year 2019: Jason's Picks

    It’s a common belief among many gamers that 2018 was a better year than 2019, but honestly, I don’t buy into it. While there wasn’t one title that was unanimously proclaimed the best game of the year (ala 2018’s God of War), I believe there was a better breadth of quality games in 2019. Nintendo in particular had a pretty strong year, with a crazy release schedule from April to November, and some huge first-party titles in the mix (hello Mario Maker 2, Fire Emblem: Three Houses, Link’s Awakening, Luigi’s Mansion 3, and Pokemon Sword/Shield!). Unfortunately, I didn’t have time to play a bunch of quality games that undoubtedly may have made my list. These include games like Outer Wilds, Knights & Bikes, Cadence of Hyrule, and Dragon Quest Builders 2. Additionally, huge shoutout to Gato Robato, a great little Metroidvania game with a ton of personality, and Automachef, which would have been #11 on this list and deserves major props for its eclectic soundtrack and original puzzle/sim gameplay and premise; if you love simulations and/or games about logistics, give it a go! That said, here are my top 10 games of 2019. 10. Marvel Ultimate Alliance 3 The combat might be a bit repetitive and not as complex as I initially hoped (the original game had more variance with number of moves and specials you could pull off), but I really can’t complain too much after the series’ nearly decade-long absence. Marvel Ultimate Alliance 3 has style and presentation in spades, and it’s great to see most of Marvel’s big heroes altogether on one screen once again. There’s just something so cool about watching your entire team take out a mob of villains/ninjas/what-have-you in the middle of places like Shadowland, Xavier’s mansion, and Avengers Tower. Huge props to Team Ninja for making the boss battles unique and interesting as well; this entry may very well be the best in that regard, specifically. 9. Mechstermination Force This title combines two of my favorite things – Shadow of the Colossus and robots/Kaiju (maybe three things, I guess?). Mechstermination Force takes from the former’s game design and adds to it by putting you in interesting, unique scenarios with each giant robot. Not only do you have to scale and find/destroy each robot mech’s weak points; you also have to adopt to their different fighting stances and forms throughout each level, making for one of the most creative 2D shooters I’ve ever played. 8. Wargroove So… I’ve never played any of the Advance Wars games before. And now I can see what I’ve missed out on for so long because Wargroove plays like Advance Wars mixed with Fire Emblem’s more medieval/fantasy-like setting (but more like the former purely in terms of gameplay). Giving players the option to build and decide what units they want to use while in the midst of a battle really gives you the option to approach most levels a number of different ways, giving the game a much more unique feel than Fire Emblem’s offense-centric approach. The campaign throws a variety of different map scenarios each with their own unique terrain and challenges at you as well, so it never feels like you’re simply replaying the same battle over and over with slightly different units. 7. SteamWorld Quest (check out GP's full review of the game here) Image & Form has made two great Metroidvania titles and one brilliant tactics title in the SteamWorld series so far, so it only makes sense that they would continue to break new ground with a new genre – that being an RPG. Or rather: card-based battling RPG. ...has one of the most memorable, compelling battle systems in an RPG this side of Octopath Traveler. SteamWorld Quest could have been a big miss if Image & Form weren’t careful; thankfully, it has one of the most memorable, compelling battle systems in an RPG this side of Octopath Traveler. Combine that with a great script with both plenty of heart and humor and some great music and visuals, and you’ve got another SteamWorld success. 6. Yooka-Laylee and the Impossible Lair Despite it being highly anticipated before its release, the first Yooka-Laylee game landed with a bit of a thud. It turns out people weren’t quite as big on 3D collectathons as they initially thought, but Playtonic quickly and correctly shifted course with their next attempt at the series by making the game into a 2D platformer this time around. ...might even rival Donkey Kong Country: Tropical Freeze; high praise indeed. And wouldn’t you know it – that old Rare magic began to shine through once again. Fortunately, they didn’t completely give up on the 3D platforming aspect either. Instead, they combined it with the overworld map for a truly unique spin on the game while making the levels in 2D. The resulting interaction between the two play types makes for an experience that might even rival Donkey Kong Country: Tropical Freeze; high praise indeed. 5. Kingdom Hearts 3 After so many years of waiting, it’s difficult to believe that Kingdom Hearts 3 isn’t 100% the game everyone wanted. Some of this has to do with disappointments on the gameplay side (the Frozen world; nuff said), but a lot of it stems from creator Tetsuya Nomura not paying off certain story arcs and narrative choices that had been previously set up for the finale. Axel/Lea and Kairi get sidelined for most of the game when the ending of DDD had set up that they’d play a more critical role (not to mention missing a huge opportunity to make both or even just Kairi playable at a certain point), and it becomes apparent by the end that Kairi is never truly given any agency in the games and is merely used as a damsel in distress for the sake of the plot. Never has the battle system been bigger, better, bolder, and even flashier, with some of the best and most vibrant visuals of this generation. Yet, despite these disappointments, Kingdom Hearts 3 still sticks the landing for the most part. Never has the battle system been bigger, better, bolder, and even flashier, with some of the best and most vibrant visuals of this generation. Most of the Disney worlds chosen make up the best selection of any of the Kingdom Hearts games, and the graphics have finally caught up to Pixar’s and Disney’s advances in animation, replicating a near-identical look to many of their 3D animated movie counterparts. Also, the game ties up Xehanort’s story arc with an epic finish in the game’s final 4-5 hours, with one of the most impressive final boss fights in the series to date. I only hope that we don’t have to wait another 13 years before the next game arrives. 4. Shovel Knight: King of Cards I loved the original Shovel Knight campaign (now known as “Shovel of Hope”) in 2014, and despite giving Plague Knight’s campaign a try, it never quite caught on with me. Because of this, I also skipped Specter Knight’s campaign two years after that. But something about the fourth campaign being centered on King Knight really made me want to give it a try. ...the best Shovel Knight campaign to date. And I’m glad I did, because you could make a real case for King of Cards being the best Shovel Knight campaign to date. The platforming is top notch, focusing on traversing the terrain with Wario Land-esque shoulder-bashing and a Ducktales-inspired pogo jump to spin off of enemies and objects. But the real star of the game is the brand new card-based minigame, Joustus. It’s smart, addictive, and has enough depth to rival long-established thinking-games like chess. Oh, and the script is hilarious to boot; Yacht Club has never felt more comfortable in their own shoes than they have been when they were writing this game. 3. The Legend of Zelda: Link’s Awakening The announcement reveal of the Switch remake of Link’s Awakening at the beginning of 2019 was, in a word, surreal. I never ruled out a remake of the game as something that could happen, but no one could have predicted that it would be remade with so much charm and originality. Yes, I’m someone who thinks the plastic/toy-like look to the visuals makes for an amazing aesthetic. It’s the second-bravest thing Nintendo has done to the Zelda series since they decided on the Ghibli-esque cel-shaded approach to The Wind Waker in 2003. Along with a new arrangement of the classic soundtrack, new life has been given to a classic in what is undoubtedly the definitive version of the game now. ...still holds up and has, in fact, made many aware that it is a better 2D Zelda game than even A Link to the Past. Link’s Awakening’s gameplay still holds up and has, in fact, made many aware that it is a better 2D Zelda game than even A Link to the Past. Yes, I did go there. But seriously, this game is magical. Go play it. 2. Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order There are so many ways Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order could have been a disaster. Or merely an extension of the okay-to-decent Star Wars games we’ve been getting for a decade now. But Respawn did it. Holy cow… they did it. They made the first great single-player Star Wars game since… what, The Force Unleashed? Maybe even Knights of the Old Republic 2? To be fair, Fallen Order could be a much tighter experience. It’s janky, likely due to EA launching the game a good half year before it was ready to come out of the oven. But it’s absolutely playable despite the occasional technical hiccup. And really, how impressive is it that the game came out as good as it did despite launching in less-than-ideal circumstances? This is a game that undoubtedly feels like you’re watching a Star Wars movie as you play. In any case, Fallen Order crafts an original tale that ties into the wider Star Wars mythos in a fairly meaningful way. Cal Kestis isn’t initially a great protagonist but the game does a great job making you care about him by gradually diving into his Jedi upbringing in the past. Cinematics are pretty fabulous as well; this is a game that undoubtedly feels like you’re watching a Star Wars movie as you play. Its story would feel right at home alongside other Star Wars side stories such as Solo, Rogue One, and The Mandalorian. But really, all I want to do is gush about how this game gives us the best lightsaber combat of any Star Wars game to date. Two of the lightsaber fights in the game made me feel like I was in a Star Wars movie; a far cry from the wild, aimless lightsaber swinging experienced in the Jedi Knight games from the early aughts. Fallen Order is the complete package: great storytelling, great gameplay, great world, great atmosphere. Where does Respawn go from here? I hope to know sooner versus later. 1. Fire Emblem: Three Houses You know what’s weird? I wasn’t initially super hyped for Three Houses despite the series being one of my all-time favorites. I didn’t know what to make of the inclusion of an academy, the MC being a professor teaching students, and participating in things like tea time with your students. It all sounded like the furthest thing I wanted from my Fire Emblem experience. Little did I know that it would be one of the best and most compelling things they ever did to the franchise. The ability to select what each of your students can learn, right down to stat bonuses, weapon proficiency, and skills is the most control Intelligent Systems has ever given you over your own units. It’s utterly gratifying to see your students progress from inefficient greenhorns to masters of their craft, dominating enemy units in battle. ...one of, if not the deepest Fire Emblem stories to date. The academy itself lends players a unique opportunity to see the larger plot through the eyes of your students in your coversations with them and also develop relationships with them by doing different activities together, making them come alive as characters. And even though the plot is a bit thicker and juicier in the first half of the game, it throws enough twists and surprises into the mix to make this one of, if not the deepest Fire Emblem stories to date. There are a lot of fascinating themes and concepts that are tackled as well, both through support conversations and the main plot. I haven’t even mentioned the actual tactical gameplay, which is as sharp as ever and gave me a real run for my money with many battles (I played on Hard). Fire Emblem: Three Houses is the real deal, and likely the best game in the series. If Intelligent Systems can continue to build on what they created with this game, Fire Emblem’s future is going to be bright indeed.
  2. 2019 was a rather strange year in the gaming space. With the inevitable release of new consoles in the near future it also feels like many developers have been hesitant to put their best gaming foot forward as if bracing themselves for the new generation of systems instead. It is also clear that the enthusiasm for the current consoles is finally dying down in regards to big-budget releases in particular. Thankfully, I have odd taste in video games, so I never personally faced a shortage in releases I wanted to play in 2019 and instead combated with the existential dread that comes from not having nearly enough time to play them instead. Either way, while I definitely did not get get anywhere close to playing everything I wanted to for the year (...with some titles still in shrink wrap like AI: The Somnium Files and Persona Q2), I did at least play enough impressive games to find an excuse to awkwardly organize a personal top ten Game of the Year list of 2019. 10) Luigi's Mansion 3 Nintendo's iconic green mascot and I have a checkered history. By that I mean I have always thought Luigi was the Scrappy Doo of the Nintendo world in which I legitimately could not find any nice words to say about most of his video game appearances, let alone his own personalized video game spin-offs. ...it has more than enough attention to detail and clever level design to have me finally accept that not all Luigi games are bad, just most of them. However, that multiple decade resentment finally started to dissipate with the charming title that is Luigi's Mansion 3. While by no means a flawless title, it has more than enough attention to detail and clever level design to have me finally accept that not all Luigi games are bad, just most of them. 9) Judgment Judgment straddles the line between being among the most impressive games that the Ryu Ga Gotoku studio has developed and also one of the most clumsy. One moment I would find myself fighting with some questionable-at-best mandatory mini-games and glacial gameplay pacing, and in the next instance witness a main narrative as well as heartwarming side quest stories that more than rivals the best moments in mainline Yakuza games. So, while I am still conflicted about the title as a whole, there is no doubt in my mind that the high points in Judgment alone make it a worthy addition to my 2019 list. 8 ) Astral Chain Of all the my favorite games of this year, Astral Chain took the longest to finally "click" with me gameplay-wise. I kept trying to approach it like Bayonetta in particular and Astral Chain very much does not want to be played like a traditional character action game. With a heavy emphasis on an action-RPG-like character progression, copious side quests, and, if played well, the level of micromanaging with the player-shackled" legion" that it almost starts to resemble complex fighting game "puppet" characters which helps make Astral Chain one of Platinum's most unique in terms of action gameplay. Astral Chain is a very promising debut that seems absolutely primed for a potentially excellent sequel. And with its successful launch sales (and an obvious campaign cliffhanger ending) a sequel only seems like a matter of time. 7) Resident Evil 2 My appreciation for Resident Evil is remarkably different than that of most people. Despite having played most of the mainline games, prior to even the various remakes, I would still say the strongest affinity I have for the series actually comes from the least scary and most action-y titles in its repertoire such as Resident 4 & 5 (5 being the most outright fun co-op experience I have had in any game). Resident Evil 2 it does a wonderful job or marrying both old and new for a series that thought to have lost its horror game roots... However, with the recent remake of Resident Evil 2 it does a wonderful job or marrying both old and new for a series that thought to have lost its horror game roots, while also, uh, having a gameplay control scheme and camera angles that are intended for humans. And players will more than need that sense of control when dealing with the ingenious implementation of Mr.X that will immediately terrify most upon hearing a familiar set of loud footsteps headed their way. 6) The Legend of Heroes: Trails of Cold Steel III I usually attempt to avoid adding games that I have not beaten to any game of the year list. Buuuut, I want to make an exception purely because the main reason I have not played more of Trails of Cold Steel III, aside from obvious finite time constraints and it being a massive RPG, is so I can have the portable convenience of the recently announced Switch release instead in the very near future. Still, in the time I have played has been delightful in spite of my lizard brain apprehension of playing a Cold Steel game on PS4. With a surprisingly likable new cast of characters, plenty of fascinating world-building, tuned up turn-based combat mechanics, and addictive social elements, Trails of Cold Steel III will almost certainly be my favorite 2019 game... that I will finally finish in 2020 (and desperately hope for its sequel localization afterwards). 5) Fire Emblem: Three Houses It took a really long time but finally, FINALLY someone did it. Somebody that is not Atlus (or Falcom) has at last made a good Persona game! ...Wait. Three Houses is the newest mainline Fire Emblem? Who are you are attempting to trick? You are trying to tell me that a game in which you spend like fifty percent of the time roaming around a school campus, constantly raising one's relationship with various students/teachers and indirectly raising combat prowess through school activities ISN'T a Persona game? Fine, I'll humor you. But in all seriousness, I am pretty easy to please with turn-based tactical-RPGs. Make a good one and it will probably sneak onto a GOTY list of mine. Ironically, I do sort of wish Three Houses had a bigger emphasis on the actual combat portions like most traditional entries, but I would be lying if I did not say the title had an absolute dominate grip on my free time regardless upon release. So much so that I have been actually afraid of doing another playthrough, but... who am I kidding? When the rest of the upcoming DLC finally gets released I plan to graduate from staring into Claude's dreamy eyes into eventually watching Dimitri lose one of his. 4) Sekiro Sekiro is odd in that it has nearly the complete opposite appeal of most of its spiritual predecessors before it. Whereas most Souls games primary strength rely on their robust RPG-like character building options within an intriguing, yet incredibly vague world-building. Sekiro has like, uh, none of that. Sure, the borderline masochistic level of difficulty is there (if not more so), but its main appeal is almost singularly focused on tight gameplay design that seamlessly blends Tenchu-esque stealth assassination elements and also highly offensive close-combat as well. ...I still get giddy thinking about the final boss of Sekiro which is a both figurative, and somewhat literal, culmination of everything the player has learned throughout its very challenging adventure. More important than any of that for me personally, though, is that Sekiro has an extremely satisfying perfect-timed parry mechanic that I loved trying to master throughout the game. So much so that while I could not tell you much about its incredibly forgettable storytelling and characters, I can tell you how I still get giddy thinking about the final boss of Sekiro which is a both figurative, and somewhat literal, culmination of everything the player has learned throughout its very challenging adventure. 3) Devil May Cry 5 Capcom has been absolutely killing it in what seems like most big-budget console games the last couple years (...that are not fighting games). I was pretty sure Platinum Games would more or less be the sole source for my deep character action game fix in a modern context. But, sure enough, after a decade long hiatus, old Dante is back and I would argue this is the best the series has ever been. Devil May Cry 5 is simply a blast to play, be it the incredibly stylish action or highly robust character moveset that has an extremely high skill ceiling when it comes to mastery. But, really, who cares about any of that, because it also blessed us with the most catchy song of 2019 Devil Trigger: "GOTTA LET IT OUT! GOTTA LET IT OUT!" 2) The House in Fata Morgana I honestly still feel guilty that I waited so long to play The House in Fata Morgana. In spite of a strong recommendation I received several years ago, and even going as far as buying a PC copy, I still waited until I re-bought the title on PS4 in 2019 to finally play it and I could not be more than glad that I finally did. This will almost certainly sound like hyperbole, but I will mean every word of it. To be blunt, I think The House in Fata Morgana is the most brilliantly written story I have ever seen in a video game -- and I absolutely do not say that lightly. Whether it be its master-class approach to foreshadowing, or the incredibly tragic yet deeply-human tales the narrative weaves it is in a league of its own for not only visual novels but video game storytelling in general. The House in Fata Morgana is the most brilliantly written story I have ever seen in a video game -- and I absolutely do not say that lightly. Now, I could easily ramble about why the narrative is so powerful, and how it does not shy away from delving into deeply unsettling subject matter to tell it, buuuut it is an easy game to spoil narrative details. So, I will just save everyone time and say if you have any sort of appreciation for visual novels, heck, amazing storytelling in general, then The House in Fata Morgana comes highly recommended and I still am pacing back and forth in my mind on whether or not I should just make it my actual GOTY. 1) Final Fantasy XIV: Shadowbringers Over the years, and little by little, Final Fantasy XIV is a game that not only got better over time but also wormed its way into my all-time favorite mainline Final Fantasy titles. As of 2019, however, there is zero doubt in my mind that Final Fantasy XIV: Shadowbringers is easily my favorite mainline title to bear the series namesake. Now, weirdly enough, Shadowbringers does not necessarily have the best intrinsic gameplay I have witnessed in 2019 nor is it even the best story (as stated by the game just before this). But saying that would greatly belittle at how excellent it is at both. As of 2019, however, there is zero doubt in my mind that Final Fantasy XIV: Shadowbringers is easily my favorite mainline title to bear the series namesake. Shadowbringers does a ton to freshen up the already beloved MMO, be it the gripping main campaign that stands far above even most Final Fantasy games to the immensely enjoyable boss fights, dungeons, and exciting new playable classes such as Dancer and Gunbreaker (or might as well be new like Machinist). Shadowbringers is not only my favorite game of 2019 it is also the one I find myself itching the most to go back to at any time. ...That said, I am still bitter about the Astrologian class changes compared to other healers. So maybe I will just put The House in Fata Morgana in this slot until Yoshi P makes me love the class again.
  3. WildCardCorsair

    Game of the Year 2019: Wildcard's Picks

    It’s always a pleasure to contribute to Game Podunk’s Game of the Year list and this year is no exception. While my picks may not be as wild as usual, they all have one thing in common: They aren’t Dragon Quest! Sorry, Barrel. With that out of the way I am pleased to introduce the seven games that made the cut. Each one has impressed me in some way, be it their graphics, originality, humor, innovation, or just how plain addictive they are, because in a year like 2019 what I really needed was some good old fashioned fun. I suppose that means I lied back there. They all have another thing in common. They were all a blast! 7. Pokémon Sword and Shield Imagine a world where you can fight weird animals against other weird animals in televised matches for the adoring masses from sold-out arenas. No, this isn’t Michael Vick’s dream come true, it’s a new Pokémon game! If we’re being completely honest I almost didn’t buy this game but I’ll be damned if I wasn’t pleasantly surprised at how it injected new life into the franchise. ...there are few things more fun than a 50-foot cake beating the snot out of a large fiery tapeworm! The “Gym Challenge” is a fun and fresh new take on gyms and Dynamax battles bring an electricity that Z-moves and Mega Evolutions never had. Raids are great too, when they work, and I can see this game having a lot of shelf life because of them. So yeah, the game is not perfect, but I’m glad I caved because there are few things more fun a 50-foot cake beating the snot out of a large fiery tapeworm! 6. Final Fantasy VIII Remastered I feel about Final Fantasy VIII the way most people feel about VII. Not because it was my first Final Fantasy game, not even because of how much I love GFs and junctioning, but because I love how weird it is. Bulbous blue aliens? Check. Humanoid cat people? Check. Hot dog envy? Check. Flinging an actual dog at your enemies? Check. How can you not love this game? Pair that with gorgeously updated character renders and a handful of quality of life improvements, I’m glad that I (and many others) have the ability to once again experience the majesty of this vastly underrated game! Suck it, @Barrel! 5. Marvel Ultimate Alliance 3: The Black Order If I’m being honest, I’m pretty sick of Avengers and Spider-Man games. We’ve got, what, like a million of them? Our Marvel and Disney overlords have a knack for cross promotion, so it’s no wonder that the last several Marvel games have focused almost entirely on Marvel’s most lucrative film franchises. But where does that leave fans of the X-Men? Or Blade and Elsa Bloodstone? Or the Fantastic Four? Or the Inhumans (wait, the Inhumans still have fans? Ha, kidding. Mostly.)? Granted, you have to pay a little extra for some of those characters but leave it to an Ultimate Alliance game to finally bring a majority of fan-favorite yet oft-unused characters to the Nintendo Switch. Though the gameplay itself hasn’t changed much, the 10-year gap between games makes it seem like less of an issue, especially when it looks as good as it does. 4. SteamWorld Quest: Hand of Gilgamech (check out GP's full review of the game here) Ever wonder what you get when you throw a bunch of steampunk cosplayers into a ren fair? Well I imagine it’d be something like Image & Form’s latest SteamWorld game: SteamWorld Quest. Mixing the hilarity of their world populated by crazy robots with the antiquity of a turn-based RPG, The Hand of Gilgamech does something I never thought could ever be done: make punch cards cool! Yessiree, those shoeboxes full of hole-punched index cards in your great grand-pappy’s attic just became useful again. Well, not really, but in spirit they are. ...way more fun than that time I made my roomba joust my google home mini. Using these randomly dealt punch cards to initiate attacks and other classic RPG actions, all while guiding a bunch of wise cracking robots through an epic quest? Well let’s just say it’s way more fun than that time I made my roomba joust my google home mini. 3. AI: The Somnium Files Remember the Zero Escape guy? The one who discussed the canonical length of Sigma Klim’s package? Well he’s back, with a game about A.I. (Artificial intelligence), ai (love in Japanese), eyes (duh), and idols? Yup, only Kentaro Ukioshi could cram this many double entendres, bad puns, and fairly inappropriate characters into a game with horrific serial murders. This time around though, the puzzle rooms give you a bit of a break as they are slimmed down to focus more on character interactions and investigations instead of obscure puzzle solving and testing the player’s math skills. Thank God too, because I suck at math. 2. Astral Chain Apparently I’m downright stupid for Platinum action games, but don’t let my borderline annoying fandom underscore how great this game is. Astral Chain has all the sexiness of Platinum’s Bayonetta games (seriously, how is every Neuron division police officer stupidly hot?), along with all the action Platinum Games is known for. All of this alone would be worth the price of admission but Astral Chain does something different. Now you get to collect cans, rescue cats, and clean up a bunch of broken red jolly ranchers! Seriously though, the side quests were such a great addition in my opinion since spreading out the highly stylized combat missions with short investigation segments not only gives you a better sense of the overall world, but makes the action bits even more intense. Kinda like orgasm denial! 1. Fire Emblem: Three Houses If you took everything that made the Persona games successful, but found a better balance between daily life and battles, sprinkled in some green hair and highly inappropriate teacher outfits, you’d have Fire Emblem: Three Houses. Not yet sold? Well this game basically takes everything the series has been known for in recent times and dials it up to eleven. You even get to take better control over unit progression. Battles feature diverse elements too, making each battle feel different from the last. But things aren’t all about fighting at Gerreg Mach Monastery. You can also pick one of three houses to represent, fish, cook, participate in dance contests, sing beautiful songs of worship, and murder your friends! What’s not to love?
  4. Hailinel

    Game of the Year 2019: Justin's Picks

    Holy moly. From start to finish, 2019 was an absolute deluge of intriguing, entertaining, high-quality games across the whole board. In compiling my top ten for the year, I honestly had to go back and double-check my memory, because I could have sworn that some of this year’s notable releases were released last year. (And in fact, a couple of games on my list this year are several years old.) It was just that packed. Of course, that also means that there’s a lot of recent games that I haven’t gotten to yet, or games that I started that I just haven’t put the time into to judge. It’s been busy, in other words. But it’s the sort of busy that’s easy to get behind, because no matter what sort of game you’re a fan of, chances are there’s a game that scratched that itch. Maybe you liked one of these ten games as much as I did! 10. Kingdom Hearts III Kingdom Hearts III is, in many ways, the game I expected. The result of a development that was stymied and delayed for years by internal issues at Square Enix stemming from the disastrous 1.0 launch of Final Fantasy XIV, the game was tasked with tying up a long-running story arc that had only become bloated with more and more characters, lore, and history as more and more spin-offs, prequels, and interlude chapters were created to keep the series alive in the years since Kingdom Hearts II. As a result, the game has a number of pacing issues, and some of the story payoffs aren’t as impactful as they could have been. There’s even a moment, breathtaking and dramatic as it is, that will mean little to players that haven’t played or have no familiarity the mobile game Union Cross. And then there’s the Disney factor, without which this series wouldn’t exist. Disney isn’t the same company it was when Kingdom Hearts II released. In recent years, it's ballooned and bloated, acquiring the rights and studios behind Star Wars and Marvel Comics, and even the entire library of 20th Century Fox. What should have been a highlight of Kingdom Hearts III, the world of Arendelle and the cast of Frozen, is perhaps the worst world and worst crossover in the entire history of the series. In addition to being a grossly overlong, awful slog, it made a friend of mine, the friend that introduced me to Kingdom Hearts no less, too motion-sick to finish the game. ...after waiting for it for years, I can safely say that I did enjoy it, even if it did leave me wanting. There are simply a lot of knocks against it. And yet, Kingdom Hearts III is still loaded with high points. Where Arendelle and Frozen fall flat on their face, the Pixar worlds based on Monsters, Inc. and Toy Story are without question the highlights. And while the race to conclude the long, long story arc that’s defined the series since the beginning stumbles here and there in notable and obvious ways, I’d be lying if I said that I didn’t have fun. (At least in any part that wasn’t Arendelle.) Kingdom Hearts III could have been a much better game, but after waiting for it for years, I can safely say that I did enjoy it, even if it did leave me wanting. 9. Daemon X Machina For the first time in a long time, there aren’t any new Musou titles on my list, but Daemon X Machina, a mech combat game of all things, fills that void in an odd way for me. The premise is straight to the point, with an apocalyptic event leaving what’s left of the world in need of skilled mech pilots to jump in their mechs to fight strange, alien enemies, and occasionally other mech pilots. The storytelling is light, but the mech combat feels smooth and is fun to control, and there are a great variety of missions. One aspect that I’ve really grown to love is the level of customization, not just in the mechs, with their frames, weapon loadouts, and aesthetics, but the player character as well. While the player starts off as a fully human custom avatar, unlocking nodes on the skill tree will literally leave their mark, resulting in new cybernetic limbs and implants that can dramatically change the visual feel of the character you play. It’s a small thing, and in a game where most of the time is spent on the field of battle, flying around in giant robots, it doesn’t even matter that much from a visual perspective, but I appreciate these details. Also, the home base has an ice cream parlor with the most hilariously jarring, upbeat music in the game, and it makes me scream for ice cream. Daemon X Machina may not be the most notable release of the year, but it’s one that I’ll be popping in playing every now and then, just to get my mecha-and-ice-cream fix. 8. Tetris 99 In the years since the Battle Royale multiplayer genre exploded on the scene with games like Playerunknown’s Battlegrounds and Fortnite, it’s been easy to make jokes about the whole premise. What else could you drop onto an island, a hundred at a time, and demand they battle to the death? Marvel superheroes? Super Smash Battle Royale? How about everyone’s favorite action game, Tetris? One hundred tetrominoes drop onto an island… Tetris 99 is amazing, and the entire world is better at it than I am. Except the madmen at Japanese developer Arika, also known for turning a goofy April Fool’s joke into the legitimate fighting game Fighting EX Layer seemingly for their own amusement, made an actual Tetris Battle Royale in Tetris 99. Tetris has been around for decades, and so has competitive multiplayer Tetris. But Tetris 99 pits literally ninety-nine players against each other in battles of absolute carnage. Tetris masters that quietly honed their skills for all these years in the privacy of their own homes finally have an outlet for their destructive energy like a cloistered Shaolin monk unleashed into a deadly martial arts tournament. And as the year has gone on, the game has only gotten better and more robust, with new modes, new challenges and bonuses, and even new themes. But one fact remains. Tetris 99 is amazing, and the entire world is better at it than I am. 7. The House in Fata Morgana The House in Fata Morgana is a visual novel that’s several years old at this point, but I didn’t start playing it until this year. And let me state up front right now that the only thing preventing me from placing it higher on my list is the fact that I haven’t finished it. ...an intense, emotional rollercoaster illustrated with beautiful art and populated with incredibly written, tragically flawed characters. The House in Fata Morgana is an intense, emotional rollercoaster illustrated with beautiful art and populated with incredibly written, tragically flawed characters. At the beginning of the game, the player awakens in an old mansion, unaware of their own identity, or even if they’re alive or dead. As they follow a mysterious maid from one room to the next, learning the mansion’s history, pieces start falling into place, and even at the game’s halfway point, where so much has been revealed, there is still so much left unknown. To really speak of the story in any sense of detail beyond this is perhaps spoiling too much, except to say that the game treads into some very dark, morbid themes, and that may be too much for some people. But The House in Fata Morgana is a ride I wish to see to its end. 6. Cadence of Hyrule: Crypt of the Necrodancer Featuring The Legend of Zelda The premise of the original Crypt of the Necrodancer, with its mix of roguelike and rhythm gameplay, is a concept that will drive some fans of either one genre or the other up the wall. But the game, while difficult, has a strong following, and it eventually made its way to the Nintendo Switch. Brace Yourself Games then had the idea, “Hey, why not ask Nintendo for permission to make a Legend of Zelda DLC pack for it?” And Nintendo replied, “Hey, why not make a whole new game instead?” Thus, Cadence of Hyrule was born! A rare instance of Nintendo letting an independent developer have fun with one of its most storied franchises, the game follows the original Necrodancer protagonist Cadence as she literally falls into Hyrule before turning the stage over to Link and Zelda in an adventure that remarkably mixes both the exploration elements of a traditional Legend of Zelda with the rhythm-based action of Crypt of the Necrodancer. Demonstrating their experience, the team behind Cadence of Hyrule made a game that’s simultaneously less punishing and more accessible than Cadence’s original adventure. A rare instance of Nintendo letting an independent developer have fun with one of its most storied franchises... And the music, composed by Danny Baranowsky, is a long list of excellent remixes of Zelda classics and a key element that makes the whole experience work. As long as he’s dropping excellent beats, I’d love to see what crazy world Cadence drops into next. 5. Untitled Goose Game HONK 4. VA-11 Hall-A: Cyberpunk Bartender Action Made by a small independent team in Venezuela, VA-11 Hall-A is a perfectly blended cocktail. A visual novel/cyberpunk bartending simulator, the game follows bartender Jill Stingray on her daily shifts at an unassuming little bar in a futuristic dystopian hellscape of a city. VA-11 Hall-A, the bar in question, is a respite from the outside world, and Jill interacts will an eclectic cast of customers ranging from an overbearing and foul-mouthed newspaper editor, to an enthusiastic gynoid sexworker, to a sleep-deprived 24/7 livestreamer, and beyond. The fun in the experience is hearing their stories, serving them drinks to help them relax and get their problems off their chests, and then seeing them on their way. And as the story picks up and the narrative focuses more on Jill’s personal life and history, the experience doesn’t lose steam. VA-11 Hall-A is a perfectly blended cocktail. The graphics and music perfectly fit the aesthetic and themes the game is going for. The perspective from behind the bar feels comfortable, even when it seems like all hell is breaking lose in the world outside. VA-11 Hall-A is a special place with no shortage of colorful characters, not all of whom we’re really intended or expected to like, but even when the jerks show up, I’m happy to see them. Originally released in 2016, I didn’t play VA-11 Hall-A until it arrived on the Switch this year, but the platform is a perfect way to experience it. I also had the opportunity to try the demo for the game’s upcoming sequel N1RV Ann-A at PAX West earlier this year, and it appears to be shaping up into something special, as well. 3. Judgment Sega’s Ryu Ga Gotoku Studio concluded the story of Yakuza series protagonist Kazuma Kiryu with Yakuza 6, but Kamurocho never sleeps. While a new installment in the series is due out next year (with some significant core gameplay changes), this year treated us to the spin-off Judgment. Now, instead of playing as a former member of the yakuza, the spotlight is on a private detective, and as such the viewpoint of Kamurocho has changed quite dramatically. Gone are old familiar old haunts like Serena, and familiar faces like Goro Majima. While the adventure of Takayuki Yagami takes place in the franchise’s most familiar district and features members of the Tojo Clan, the story is completely distinct in character, tone, and feeling from everything that has come before. It’s a murder mystery told with the same narrative style as the more recent Yakuza games, but with a protagonist who’s naturally more outgoing and personable, and by the nature of his profession is in the public eye far more often. The franchise’s sense of humor is of course back, with plenty of absurd bystanders for Yagami to help, and the minigames this time around include a Kamurocho-based parody of Sega’s House of the Dead. The main story even manages to turn the franchise’s hostess minigame on its head with a level of self-awareness that let’s the player know that, like in real life, it’s not just fun and games. While Judgment’s core gameplay and much of its flow are like the games that preceded it, it manages to carve an identity all its own. I’d love to see a Judgment 2 and the further adventures of Yagami, even as the main series veers into a new era with Yakuza: Like a Dragon. 2. Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night Full disclosure: I was a backer of Bloodstained on Kickstarter, when the campaign was in full swing and the fever to see a new Castlevania in all but name was at a fever pitch. This was an era when Kickstarted projects from big name producers and developers weren’t uncommon, and the results that came from them were, to be polite and without naming names, mixed. Bloodstained went through its own set of delays, and had its own long list of stretch goals from its Kickstarter that the team led by creator Koji Igarashi felt obliged to meet. Among these goals was a Wii U version. The Wii U, of course, is a dead console now, and so the team chose to cancel that version and offer a Switch version instead. The Switch version is the version I collected as my backer reward, and the version I played from the moment I received it in the mail. It’s perhaps the most technically flawed version, and the one that the dev team has put by far the most effort into patching since release. All I wanted was a game like the Castlevania titles that Igarashi spent so many years making, and he delivered. With all that being said, I love Bloodstained, technical warts and all. All I wanted was a game like the Castlevania titles that Igarashi spent so many years making, and he delivered. He and his team delivered big time, and they fulfilled basically every desire I had, from its music, to the size and scope of the castle, to the characters and story, even with their close parallels to Symphony of the Night. The technical shortcomings of the Switch version didn’t bother me at all. I love it, I want to play it again, I want to play a sequel. Though the game that shipped was less than perfect in a technical sense, Bloodstained is an example a Kickstarter project done right. And with how often similar campaigns resulted in little more than “better than nothing,” that’s no small feat. 1. Fire Emblem: Three Houses Fire Emblem has had one hell of a turbulent decade. A little less than ten years ago, the second DS entry, New Mystery of the Emblem, wasn’t even localized because its predecessor, Shadow Dragon, tanked in sales. Nintendo had considered mothballing the franchise if the 3DS entry Fire Emblem Awakening didn’t sell at least 250,000 units, and there was a lot of concern from western fans that Awakening wouldn’t even be localized. But it was. And then the franchise exploded into a new international level of popularity that it had never seen before, and that neither Nintendo nor Intelligent Systems likely ever saw coming. Two more 3DS entries followed. Fire Emblem Fates, coming off the heels of Awakening, unfortunately became a lightning rod and whipping post for series fans for a variety of reasons. The story, split into three separate games meant for different audiences, was written and rewritten into a narrative mess, and the game doubled down hard on the relationship aspects that Awakening fans enjoyed, complete with characters meant to appeal to that aspect of the game that some felt went overboard. Since its release, Fire Emblem communities and threads were mostly a firestorm of hatred for Fates and little else. This attitude persisted even when Fates was followed by a modern remake of Fire Emblem Gaiden a couple of years later. And of course, there were Tokyo Mirage Sessions, Fire Emblem Heroes, and Fire Emblem Warriors, which led to their own fan dramas. It became a joke that no one hates Fire Emblem more than Fire Emblem fans. It would require a special game to unify all of the squabbling factions. And when Fire Emblem: Three Houses was first revealed, that Fates angst was back in force. Some fans convinced themselves from the very start that it would become Fates 2, even though nothing hinted that it would be the case. And you know what? Those fans were dead wrong. ...the game’s cast of characters features some of the deepest, most fully realized protagonists and antagonists that the series has ever seen. Fire Emblem: Three Houses is easily the best Fire Emblem game in many years. It’s also one of the most experimental, with the game’s development team at Koei Tecmo adding a whole new gameplay phase involving exploring a monastery home base, teaching at an academy, getting to know the protagonist Byleth’s students over meals and during tea parties, and in general putting a much stronger emphasis on the social and relationship elements than any prior game before it. Three Houses is most explicitly like Fates in one way. The game’s campaign branches based on the academy house Byleth chooses to teach. But while the campaigns in Fates were designed such that one was for newcomers, one was for series veterans, and a third met somewhere in between (and all three had to be purchased separately), the branches of Three Houses offer experiences meant for all players, and each offers its own sense of wonder, mystery, triumph, and heartache. The uniqueness of each branch particularly as the game’s calendar shifts, and the stakes rise. Three Houses isn’t the prettiest game to look at from a technical perspective, but the artistic sense of its world and characters, and the way it makes effective use of its excellent soundtrack, stands clear above other entries in the franchise. And the game’s cast of characters features some of the deepest, most fully realized protagonists and antagonists that the series has ever seen. It lets go of the past in some ways, ignoring many of the oldest Fire Emblem character tropes, but embraces and reflects on others in new and interesting ways. It takes hints and cues from entries like Genealogy of the Holy War, which producers have specifically cited as an inspiration. In some ways, Three Houses feels like it could be a dress rehearsal for a Genealogy remake. But to call it a dress rehearsal of anything is selling the game far, far too short. Simply put, Fire Emblem: Three Houses is my favorite game of 2019, and at this point, ranks high as possibly my favorite Fire Emblem game ever.
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